Trondheim Calling again

The Trondheim Calling festival is opens the 1st of February this year, and will fill some of the most important venues in town, including Byscenen, Kunsthall Trondheim and Studentersamfundet.

Trondheim Calling is an annual music festival and, importantly, a music conference. It has grown to be one of the biggest music industry events in the country. In February 2017, Trondheim Calling had more than 8000 spectators and 1000 delegates enjoying 115 shows spread out at 15 different venues, with 80 aspiring young artists from all across Norway.

Markus Sletten, who is the head of booking and one of the curators of the artistic programme, when asked how the artists have been selected, says, “The first priority when picking artists for the festival – the factor that triumphs over everything else – is the music. The quality, originality, the talent behind it and how it’s relevant to today’s and tomorrow’s music scene, is what’s definitely most important. We do a lot of talking with people all over the country, people working in the music industry. In fact, we also try to represent different people and organizations in the music industry, as well as new artists.” The artists who are invited to perform at the festival, come from the whole Norway, and represent diversity in terms of genre and gender.

“Picking one, or even a select few highlights from the upcoming festival has proven to be a difficult task for me”, says Mark, but here are some of his recommendations:

– Steamdome: Three of Norway’s (might I say the world’s) greatest drummers, a team of musicians with an absurdly diverse musical background (from jazz and experimental, to folk-music, to BigBang, Sivert Høyem’s band, El Cuero and Broen) and a fiddler Ola Kvernberg at the helm.

– SASSY 009: Three young producers slash musicians put out their first song; three days later their all over the internet, featured in some of the biggest music sites in the world, including Pitchfork. No doubt Sunniva, Teodora and Johanna are heading somewhere with their cool, dark, and groovy mix of electronic and organic sounds.

– Årabrot: They’re finally back with their first show in two years, and the follow-up to the 2016 masterpiece “The Gospel” is right around the corner. Their music has been difficult to categorize ever since the start in 2001, but this band has been widely regarded as a phenomenon within the experimental rock scene and has fans all over the world. 

 

Date: February 1-3, 2018

Locations: Diverse & City-wide

Price: 275- 795 NOK

More info: www.trondheimcalling.no

 

 

A Vegan Christmas: Interview with Emma Jarvis

This weekend in Trondheim is the official start of the holiday season (though walking into many shops around town you might have thought it started weeks ago).

The List caught up with Emma Jarvis, founder of the Trondheim Vegan Fair, who are hosting their own Christmas Market this weekend at Verkstedhallen and Habitat. The market is free to enter and boasts a variety of shopping, eating, learning, and entertainment options.

How did the Trondheim Vegan Fair get started?

“I started it. I lived in Oslo for one year and really enjoyed the Oslo Vegetarfestival. When I moved up here and found nothing really going on in the same vein, I wanted to get something started.”

“This is the first time we’ve done a Christmas market, we have the festival in the spring which is more focused on practical stuff, where this event is more to celebrate the season and have fun.”

Why did you choose Veganism?

“I’ve been a vegan for about four years; since I went to university I was quite involved in the environmentalism stuff. So initially I came into it through that; that it’s more environmentally friendly to eat vegan.”

“But that’s not the thing with the vegan fair, not to be preachy. Its just about getting people to try different foods, inspire people. Take the cookery classes for instance where people can learn to cook great food that is also vegan.”

Why is the Vegan Fair important?

“I think that Trondheim has a lot of really cool cultural events, and this just adds to that diversity. Also, more and more people are choosing to eat less animal products like meat and cheese; Coop now has vegetarian day and Synnøve now has a vegan cheese.”

“It also provides an easy platform to teach and learn about veganism – helping people to think about how they can cook a meal differently or just enjoy different kinds of food.”

How would you convince someone to come to the Christmas Market?

“You get to try loads of awesome food, stuff that’s not normally in Trondheim. Like a vegan-friendly bakery from Oslo that are coming with cakes and vegan ice cream! Another company that makes artisan vegan cheese that is delicious.”

Photo: Furu Creamery

“It’s a fun place and a food festival where you can learn lots of stuff. Theres a workshop on how to have an environmentally friendly Christmas; the documentary that shows how people in Norway are shifting to more plant based diets, which is neat that it has a Norwegian context which will hopefully be much more relatable for Norwegians.”

“A mix of workshops in both Norwegian and English, its about 50/50 so it will be accessible for most people! The Market has super good vibes, and it’s free!”

There is an after party as well?

“Yes, at Habitat. The awards ceremony for things like the best vegan friendly restaurant, there will be different musicians that will be playing like Sivert Ericson and also Gibberish the improve comedy group, but its mostly about hanging out, eating pizza, and being social. It’s a party!”

Photo: LOS365

Don’t miss out on this unique and fun event this holiday season. Starting at 11:00 at Verkstedhallen, it will be a great way to spend a day out of the cold!

RAKE

Rake Visningrom is one of the more interesting locales in Trondheim – from both an exterior and interior standpoint. The uniquely crafted building lies where the city meets Trondheimfjorden, just up from the ferry terminal.

The List met up with one half of the dynamic duo that curates and runs the showroom, Charlotte Rostad, to talk about art, RAKE, and Trondheim in general.

Photo: Susann Jamtøy | Artwork: Marte Eknæs and Marianne Hurum

“RAKE is a non-commercial space to show art, run by two people, so it’s a very independent place to hold exhibitions. We’ve been running it for six years now, and this building is our third location.”

“We do lots of things, like our regular programmes with mostly solo-exhibitions. We’re always trying to make it surprising for us, and for Trondheim, always trying to do new things, like experimenting with exhibit format. So we do things in the space, but also larger things outside, or in cooperation with other locations.”

“We bring this stuff in so we can talk about art in its broader sense. To have fun, and to play, and be able to meet other artists and have those discussions is sort of our goal. The art scene in Trondheim is very small, so to bring in other people and be able to constantly talk about art is something very special to us.”

Photo: Susann Jamtøy | Artwork: Marte Eknæs and Marianne Hurum

A new exhibition opens up this evening at RAKE. Stop in for their social event tonight, or check it out over the coming weeks. The exhibition will be featuring the work of Gabriel Johann Kvendseth, an artist based out of Bergen.

“Its kind of sculpture based, its like equipment made out of garbage and things he finds on the street. And makes these beautiful pieces that resembles tools. It’s really quite strong. It will be interesting to see how the space is used to show his work.”

Bastard!

Looking for something to do this weekend? Then check out Avant Garden’s Bastard Festival; it starts tomorrow and runs through the weekend.

This annual, performing arts festival seeks to surprise and prod its audience – and take a

You Look Like You // Photo by Efrat Mazor Goldberg

 

good, hard look at our global society in the process. The program for this year’s festival features dance, theatre, film, and every combination of them. Not to mention the artist talks, workshops, seminars, and other social events.

Each fall, The Bastard Festival presents some of the very best contemporary performing arts projects from the Norwegian and international independent art scene. We decided to talk with some of the festival organizers to find out more about some of the performances and find out which ones shouldn’t be missed.

Piece for Person and Ghetto Blaster // Photo by Sarah Walker

The first suggestion was Piece for Person and Ghetto Blaster: a dissection of human behaviour in regards to the complexities of intervention. The performance stems from an interaction the artist had with a man throwing stones at a duck. Branded as “stand-up choreography” this piece mixes dance and humorous text that is sure to appease.

Another to look forward to is (re)remember study – Trondheim. In this, the performance artists asks Trondheim locals to talk them around the city and take them to places with particularly fond memories associated with it. The walks are documented through various mediums; then in a live composition the stories are re-remembered and interpreted through the artistic meditations of the performers.

Bastard Festival offers something unique to the city of Trondheim, and while the artistic side of it may seem daunting, or perhaps too avant garde, to some, the experience is fantastic no matter your sensibilities.

MERCURIAL GEORGE SHOW / Photo by Jocelyn Michel

The stage is set at venues all across town: Teaterhuset Avant Garden, Trøndelag Teater, Olavshallen, Verkstedhallen, Trondhjems kunstforening, a storefront venue and festival bar, Moskus.

 

If you want to find out more about Bastard Festivalen you will find all the info on Avant Garden’s website, in our magazine and recent blog post where we interviewed theatre boss Per Ananiassen.

 

Stay up to date on what’s going on and what to do in Trondheim: http://thelistn.wwwnlss7.a2hosted.com/