Meet Your Makers: Spætt Film

For this week’s edition of Meet Your Makers, The List stopped by the Spætt Film office to talk to director Magnus Skatvold and CEO/Co-Producer Håvard Gosse about their recent hit film: Trondheimsreisen. They premiered the documentary during Kosmorama International Film Festival this past March and received great acclaim.

For those that missed it during Kosmorama, or those wanting to see it a second time, the film is still currently in theatres.

Peep the trailer:How did you first become interested in film?

Magnus:

For me, it very much so has been a lifelong passion. I’ve been a film-buff since my childhood and I have kind of known from the time

Photo courtesy of Spætt FIlm

I was 10 or 11 that at some point I was going to work with film; either has an actor or director. I was just fascinated with the world of film.

– Any movie in particular?

I think Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2 was one of the first films I saw in the cinema, probably a little too young to see it, but that was just such a profound experience for me.

 

Håvard:

I like to tell a fun story which is when I was born my parents were out at the cinema; watching To Menn for En Baby. I wanted to get out and spoil this horrible film for them…I don’t know if they’ve ever watched it again.

Photo courtesy of Spætt Film

Then my plan was to be an engineer, but I always borrowed my dad’s camera to film little clips. Then I studied math, chemistry, and physics at university and got some extra points for that which got me into my dream course: the film course at NTNU. So thanks to me trying to be an engineer I got into the film class and its grown from there!

 

 

 

Where did the project of Trondheimsreisen come from?

Magnus:

This project had been in development for about a year before we got attached to it. Trondheim Cinema and the producer were in talks about putting to use some the many kilometers of films stock they had stored. And that began the process of what it should be used for, whether a documentary or something else.

We got approached to take a look at the material and got involved in the process. Then we started with interviews, for research and for something we could use in the film. So we started with interesting storytellers in Trondheim, not necessarily famous people, but ones that had personal and historical stories to tell.

Håvard:

We are really happy that Dag Hoel came to us with this project. As we said he had been developing something with Trondheim Kino, but then he needed a storyteller to come on board. Dag Hoel is one of the all-timers here in Trondheim; he’s been producing for many, many years. He knows me from previous work we have done together and of course, Magnus was on his radar as well for being one of the young, new directors from the region that has a lot of experience. So it was well timed that he came to Magnus for the director position.

Magnus:

The dynamic between the producer and myself was very good for the project. We had different views on materials and experience and two voices to tell the story. This resulted in, mainly, positive discussions on the what the story is and could be – which is so broad as we are telling the story of Trondheim over the course of 100 years.

How long did it take to complete the film?

Magnus:

We were contacted about the film about two years ago. The process started there, and while it hasn’t been full time, I’ve spent several hours a week, every week on it for the past two years. It was a lot of different processes, one being getting a hold of all the material and looking through it – which takes hours and hours. You also have to think about it and let it sink in and start to build a story in your head.

There is also the process of editing it all together that started very early on. Within the first month, I started editing together little scenes and trying to get a hold of the style I wanted to use.

Choosing the footage was quite intuitive in a sense. I had done a couple of interviews that were very open, just sitting down with people for an hour or two talking about their lives with no clear agenda. I just wanted to get as much openness as possible, and people ended up using me almost like a therapist. They were talking about things they hadn’t thought about in 10-20 years; people were opening up and crying. I think there is something that happens when people speak to someone half their age or younger starts asking about their lives. How was it being in love during this time or that? What was it like experiencing the war? That gave me a lot to work with.

How was the process compared to your previous work?

Magnus:

This project is very special because we had to find a way of doing it, almost inventing a new way of thinking. The story we were telling isn’t linear where you have a script and just need to follow that. All the materials we had, from the footage, the interviews, and even the sound design was influencing each other. It was after the interviews that I really knew what to look for in the material and footage we had, but also it worked the other way and the material gave me ideas about what to ask people during the interviews.

Håvard:

The only mainframe we really had to guide the process of creating the film was that it started with this shot from 1906 and the ending using footage from the 1980’s. Most people would have organized the film to have it all in chronological order, but Magnus managed to find some kind of fluctuating way to tell the story that still makes it feel like it is going from one point to another. Which is a much more interesting film, I think.

Magnus:

It was a challenge because it needed some structure. The film is chronological in a way that it starts one way and ends more modern in some parts, but it takes some liberties in jumping between decades in ways we felt it was necessary to tell the story. We see the timeline as not only chronological but where do you place something like being a student at NTNU into a specific time period? We wanted to tell things like that, like being a student, as some broader. That we could mix clips from the 1940’s or 60’s or 80’s and that things are very much the same, but also has its differences.

How long did it take to look through all that footage?

Magnus:

Our material came from a lot of sources, from the national library, Studentersammfundet, NRK, and even regular people sending us film from their own collections.

That footage isn’t the same type of quality like some of the stuff from NRK, but having those private moments from real Trondheimer’s became the soul of the film.

Håvard:

We bought a machine to digitize the film ourselves but quickly found out that it wasn’t enough. We could use it to watch through the film but had to send it to a specialist to digitalize it. But its great as now all the footage is being sent to the National Library to be stored and is great for documenting our history.

How was the premiere?

Håvard:

It was awesome for us. I was sitting next to two musicians that have a song in the film and overheard them talking about how they were touched by the film along with everyone else. Everyone was talking about their own experiences in the city, and that was great to hear.

We had people coming up and telling us that they were never going to leave Trondheim again!

Magnus:

It was an overwhelming experience. I’d seen the film 10-20 times already, but it really came alive seeing it with a large audience. It was definitely a high point in my professional life – presenting it with Liv Ullmann of all people and getting such positive feedback from the audience. I had people coming up to me that I didn’t know to thank me for making the film.

We knew of course that this would be popular amongst the older generations of people in Trondheim, but it has shown itself to be more of a cross-generational film and bringing people together.

What’s next?

Magnus:

After Trondheimsreisen it was very good to go back to doing more short-term projects. Also working with the documentary ‘Blue Code of Silence’ [A documentary film about the story of the infamous NYPD officer Bob Leuci] and hopefully we will get some more answers on that in the coming months.

Håvard:

We [Spætt Films] have a short film that is being made with Vegard [Dahle] as director. He made the film ‘Eye’ last year, which won the 72-hour competition at the Jinzhen International Short Film Festival in China last year. We are making a behind-the-scenes movie on that as well. We also have a few feature films that are in development.

Keep an eye out for much more from Spætt films in the future. With some exciting documentaries, fiction films, and entertaining commercials currently in the works. Check out some more of their past, current, and future projects here!

Also stay tuned to TheList.no for a few film suggestions from these two!

Meet your Makers: TinaTing

In the latest volume of The List Magazine, we took a look at some men and women who make stuff in Trondheim. Here, we’d like to introduce Tina Bugge of TinaTing and her beautiful origami artwork. Check out the article in the magazine and enjoy this full interview!

When did you start and what gave you the inspiration to start your business?

I have always liked working with my hands, I’m a very tactile person, with a knack for details. I used to work full time with really practical, minute operations as a staff engineer at NTNU, but with more administrative tasks and less time in the lab, I needed to keep my hands busy.

I started the webshop TinaTing on the marketplace Epla.no at the end of a maternity leave in the summer of 2011. TinaTing is all about eye candy. Either with regards to origami pictures, origami diamonds, origami lamps, or button jewelry. I have come up with a technique where I cover buttons with paper, and then turn them into jewelry like earrings, brooches, rings or cufflinks. This is rather time-consuming, so there is less time for that, unfortunately. Enter origami! Almost instant satisfaction! The metallic paper is an inspiration in itself. It will sparkle when the light hits it at different angles. Origami is all about folding and angles, so I would say it is a perfect match! Some would argue the metallic paper is too tough to fold, but I like it a bit al dente. For instance, if the paper it too light, a PHiZZ-orb for a lamp will fall apart. The lamp is made of 30 identical pieces put together with no glue. Watching a lamp slowly coming apart just from its own weight is strange.

I was invited to join the design collective Sukker in April 2015, and I am still honoured they asked me! The designers there are really an inspiring crowd to hang with. Having an actual store where you can present and sell your things, and meet people who appreciate your design is awesome. Every designer takes a turn to work in the shop. If I hear someone in the shop for instance say – I like that PRSM-picture, but would like it in another colour -, then I can offer to make it. Making pieces which go well with the other designers’ products is also cool. Lise of Miniminuskel and I are making matching dresses of different materials; she makes petite ones for girls, while I fold paper versions. Together they make great presents!

Do you consider yourself a ‘maker’? What do you do with the rest of your time and what is your background making things?

I do indeed consider myself a maker. I like to make eye candy and am easily mesmerized by lovely colours, and especially paper. But nice paper is hard to find in Norway, so I make an effort finding paper online or whenever I travel. With Norwegian import taxes, and sky-rocketing shipping fares it is challenging, but all the more fun when you can make a bargain or a good deal! And somehow along this way, I also ended up becoming the Norwegian retailer for a Canadian paper distributor of Japanese chiyogami paper.

I work full time as a staff engineer at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, I am a mom of two, and a member of the design community Sukker. Besides that, I will fold whenever and wherever, just ask whoever. I always carry paper in my bag, and will fold in planes, trains, automobiles, sofas, parks….

I used to work more hands-on in the lab at NTNU, but with less time in the lab now, I need to keep my hands busy, and origami is perfect! The repetitive folding is like meditation. The joy of creating something beautiful from a flat sheet of paper is just awesome! And building something with modules is amazing, especially if you really couldn’t wrap your head around the instructions in the first place! I still have a piece at home that I really struggled with, that I can’t reproduce. I cannot remember how I did it or crack the code. Really frustrating!

I will never make drawings before making anything. The paper itself is the inspiration. These days are mostly about making beautiful dresses and shirts for cards.

Photo Courtesy of TinaTing

Tell us a little more about the product: what makes it unique, where it is made and any special techniques?

I think people can tell when it is a TinaTing. I am all about straight lines and edges. If it is not a right angle, it is a wrong angle. Sloppy origami is irritating. Colour coordinating is also fun. When making the origami pictures I will sometimes throw the pieces around on the table, and then maybe an unlikely colour combo will appear. The PRSM-pictures are maybe the “most” TinaTing I make.

I am a self-taught origamist and have never invented any origami designs myself. I am in awe of the people who are able to think up the original diagrams!! I will learn new techniques from YouTube rather than from a book. See one, do one, teach one. So why is my stuff special/different from others? I would say the presentation/the whole package; the precision, the materials, and the colour combinations. I have nice paper! I leave nothing to chance (or sometimes everything, it could, seem…). I deliver a complete product, all the way down to the packaging.

What has the area of Trøndelag bring to your making? Could this be possible anywhere else? Would it look different if it was?

I am a native Trønder from Trondheim, so I’ve never left! The size of Trondheim, with the “closeness” to everything, makes it perfect. You can walk or bike to almost anywhere, and the community of designers is very inspiring and including. Being a native Trønder means many of the people I grew up with are still around, thus I can ask them for help, more so than if I was from outside Trondheim. Knowing people at NTNU and the workshops at St.Olav has come in handy in my creative work as well. It is not all about what you know, but who you know. This keeps coming back to me. I would never be this successful in Oslo, as I have no such basic network there. Being an introvert and a creative exhibitionist is hard when you want to sell your stuff. I have been very fortunate, and I feel I have taken the opportunities that have been given and did the most with them.

Photo Courtesy of TinaTing

And the something unique to you and the product we wouldn’t necessarily know?

I may have it all covered? I am also working on outdoor origami. The weather in Trøndelag isn’t always sunny, so I have made PHiZZ-balls that can be placed in the garden. Where I live it will roll around in the garden in the wind. Looking forward to letting it play in the grass again.

And finally, info for people who would like to know more about or to buy the product etc., where are you online?

Instagram would be the most up to date place to find me: @tinabugge.

Facebook: TinaTing 

Artwork and origami paper can be found here.

In person: In Trondheim, the store Sukker, in Bakklandet, is the best place to find my stuff.

And if you are in Oslo you can find TinaTings at Skaperverket in Grünerløkka.

Trondheim Easter Egg Hunt

Last year we wrote up ten different ideas for what to do during the Easter holidays–a sort of activity easter egg hunt. Are you up for the hunt this year? Here are five to get you started.

Read the full article right here!

Words by Tijana Ostojic

First swim of the year

Photo: Todd Quackenbush

If this Easter you are in the company of kids, or even if you are not, how about you finally make that swimming trip you have been planning for a long while now?

The ten-meter dive in Pirbadet sure sounds impressive if you are brave enough to jump, but would you dare jump in the fjord and initiate the beginning of the swimming season?

Here at the List, we hope you would, so we suggest Sjøbadet. Right in the heart of Trondheim, Sjøbadet is a facility equipped with warm showers you might wish for once you give a spring fjord swimming a go. Needless to say, swimming in the fjord does give you bragging rights.

Check out the Library

You might be wondering why we are stopping at the library, but here’s why.

Can you imagine yourself snuggled up on the sofa with a crime novel in your hands? It might be snowing outside, or perhaps not, but you are not aware of it since you are racing through the pages of your book, eager to find out what will happen next.

Norwegian Easter – Crime phenomenon (påskekrim) began in 1923 by the Gyldendal Publishing House which published an ad in the newspapers that at first glance looked like a regular news bulletin. The entry read “The Bergen Train Robbed Last Night”, promoting a crime novel written by Nordahl Grieg and Nils Lie.

The book was a success, and in the years that followed Easter time became synonymous with the peak season for crime literature.

So, why not snuggle up on your sofa and read a crime novel or two while you are waiting for your Easter leg of lamb to roast in the oven? Have a cup of tea or a glass of wine and enjoy a good book.

If you are searching for a place to escape your couch, let us say a place that also serves great coffee, delicious food and has an abundance of books to choose from, give Sellanraa Bok & Bar’s couch a try – you’ll hardly regret it.

Vasfjellet or cross-country skiing

 

 

 

Photo: Anders Kallerud

A farewell to ski season is upon us. Therefore, if the weather allows it, make an effort and go for one last downhill ski trip to Vasfjellet. The sun is finally shining and the idea of some last few turns in this season is tempting, is it not?

You might know by now that cross-country skiing, like the crime novel, is also synonymous with Easter. So, make sure you have packed a few oranges (said to represent the Sun) and KvikkLunsj, as these are the trademarks of an Easter ski trip.

The story goes that a long time ago, Johan Throne Holst, the founder of Freia, went hiking with a colleague one day. Somewhere along the way, they got lost, and the colleague scolded Mr. Holst, who for the very first time had forgotten to bring chocolate on the trip. It is no wonder the KvikkLunsj wrapper displays hiking routes now. So, why don’t you pick up a bar or two and choose from many hiking/trekking/possibly skiing routes they suggest?

After all, you remember that time when you went hiking/trekking/skiing and have forgotten to bring few bars of KvikkLunsj with you? Yeah, neither do we.

Cycling along Skansen and Ladestien

Photo: Nikol Herec

The time has finally come when those who do not dare to cycle throughout the winter to dust the cobwebs off their bikes. With that said; it is a great time to hop on a bike and go for a ride along Skansen and Ladestien. Along the way, you could stop by Lille Skansen, Ladekaia or Sponhuset for a drink or a quick bite.

Don’t own a bike? Well, then we recommend a long, rewarding walk along these trails by the sea.

Learn something at Vitensenteret

 

Photo: Wil Lee-Wright Photography

Vitensenteret is an attractive place for all those who love the wonders of science. Whether you are an adult or a kid, adventure and fun are guaranteed. Besides exciting exhibitions, there are several activities that children are sure to enjoy. Fancy building a ballong bil (we will not tell you what it is, you’ll have to check it out yourself), making a vitamin C rocket, casting pewter figurines, or driving Orbitron?

This is where our ‘Trondheim egg hunt’ ends. The city is stunning during the Easter time too, is it not?

But, if this year you have decided to go on a little adventure somewhere outside the Trondheim’s region, why not rent a cabin with few friends? Don’t forget to bring your skis, a crime novel, Kvikklunsj and good mood along!

Tak for turen!

Kosmorama: Wasted

Last night we went over to Credo Restaurant to check out the Kulinarisk Kino programme Kosmorama had organized.

The film was Wasted, which talked about food waste in contemporary society and also highlighted people, programmes, and things everyone can do at home in order to reduce waste.

The movie was both entertaining and eye-opening. It was nicely balanced between talking about how bad things are and also how things are being done to alleviate the bad things. And it certainly had me taking a look at my own habits and thinking about what I could change.

Served with the movie was a delicious cup of soup from Credo that was made entirely from leftover/scraps from the cooking process. I couldn’t tell you exactly what kind of soup it was, but it was delicious.

After the movie, Heidi Bjerkan got up and spoke about the ethos of Credo, and how it is continuously trying to reduce waste in the restaurant. She also talked about a lot of the work they do with partners that supply the restaurant to do the same thing.

The movie has been out for awhile, but I had not yet watched it and I certainly recommend it for anyone who hasn’t. And we also recommended booking a table at Credo.

An Interview with Kjersti Buaas

The List connected with Trøndelag’s Olympic World Snowboarder, Kjersti Buaas for issue #14 that came out at the start of 2017. To celebrate International Women’s Day, we thought we would give it another share!

Words by The List’s very own Jaya Thomlison.

Read the whole magazine here!

Photo: Nikol Herec

Kjersti Buaas, Body and Mind

Approximately 20 years ago in the small town of Klæbu, just outside of Trondheim, a girl raised in the outdoors tried out something new for the first time, and through love, passion and perseverance eventually became one of Trøndelag’s prized Olympic medal winners.

Kjersti Buaas is a rather known name for anyone that has followed the past four Olympic Winter Games. What you may not have known is that she is a proclaimed Trondheim ambassador. While residing in California for the time being, Kjersti makes it her mission to support others interested in outdoor sports to find a balance between their mind, body, and soul.

Kjersti, can you tell our readers about yourself?

I’m originally from Trondheim and I grew up doing a lot of different sports. I was introduced to snowboarding at the age of twelve when my older sister was trying it out and I wanted to be just like her, of course. Snowboarding was something that I fell in love with immediately. It felt creative and fun to move around and move my body in that way. I never set out with an ambition to create a career… but snowboarding has since become my job and profession. For the past eighteen years of I have been professionally competing, resulting in four Olympics, winning A bronze medal and a couple of silver medals as well. Winning golds in various X-games.

Photo: Nikol Herec

Yours is not the most common life-path, albeit incredibly inspiring. How did you initially get involved in competitive sports?

Something that Norwegians might underestimate is the benefit of being born in a place where people are encouraged to get outdoors and test their limits. Growing up in Trondheim, we had to get out of our comfort zones, whether it was the weather, or something else. I was also lucky to have role models and good people supporting me, including coaches and a national team. I have had a very nice support system from the start. That is really important when you are at the age when you are trying to find your inner strength.

It also feels kind of safe to be in Norway and to be a Norwegian as it’s a small country. I think that we can identify with one another easier because we are only 5 million or so. It has not been easy to find a clear path and everyone must experience the same. I mean, I have never really doubted that it’s what I wanted to do, though I never really decided ‘this is what I am going to do, I’m going to be a professional snowboarder and compete in the Olympics’. Luckily I had all of those people around me, without them I could not have done it.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

As a female, what are were some of the mental breakthroughs you needed in order to engage in competitive sports?

I associate some of my drive to resiliency. Whether it’s just weather, cultural tradition or determination. This is all important. In the beginning, snowboarding gave me a new way to think, a new way live and to view myself. I was surrounded by female athletes, yet snowboarding has always been a very friendly sport. So even though we were competing against each other, we became really good friends. A key factor is finding your community. Being that snowboarding was a smaller community worldwide than other competitive sports, we weren’t afraid to share. We weren’t afraid to share strategies with each other were open about it. We pushed each other to watch documentaries about, let’s say food and agriculture, in order to learn what’s behind it. After seeing learning what happens in other places, such as American agriculture, I was shocked. My snowboarding community has helped me access education and knowledge so I that I could make conscious and good choices that would be good more me, and for the world.

Do you think that growing up in this region has had anything to do with your career path?

I grew up in a very active family and we always spent most of our time outdoors. That is to say, I had it in my blood and I loved it. I think that Trøndersk culture is very tough and strong. You know, it’s never really bad weather, we just go outside. In Norway, you will see people going to work on a bike in a rainstorm and it doesn’t matter. In other parts of California, they’ll say it is horrible weather when there is one cloud in the sky and wouldn’t consider riding a bike in the rain. I think that something so simple as coming from a culture where you are not afraid to face nature has helped me understand how to push my own limitations.

“There are no boundaries.”

I brought this outlook with me to into a male-dominated sport where at the time, girls were a token. When there was one spot on a snowboarding team for a girl and that spot was filled, we may have previously thought ‘it’s already taken’. I started challenging this. My upbringing encouraged me to change my way of thinking and follow my heart in order to solve the problem differently. I would try out for the team anyhow. I believed that if I followed mind, body, and soul, I could inspire other people. My perspective is, before the action, it’s just a thought. But everything changes once you start doing it. At some point, I realised my own power. Then I started realising that all anyone has to do is start thinking differently and seeing the potential for change. In that respect, being a professional athlete is simply a way to do life. The benefit is that you get to experience so many things, challenge yourself so intensively both in competition and under pressure.

Photo: Nikol Herec

Snowboarding is often considered a young person’s sport, though you grew up in Norway where you don’t have strong conforming factors related to age – people in their 60s and 70s are still climbing, skiing and are showing that body is actually a tool. What do you have to do to keep yourself healthy and competitive at over the age of thirty?

I’ve done a lot of different things within the sport and I’m still loving it. Yes, I’m still competing with all these teenagers as young as fourteen… and it is about breaking stereotypes. You might think that you need to retire from professional sports in your late 20s because that’s the norm. And then you realise that it’s just a norm and not the rule. I think that coming from a culture where you are free to keep working beyond ‘pension age’ if you choose to, affects you. People are inspired by their peers no matter the age, whether they are parents, grandparents or friends. We will always look to what is around us and draw inspiration from it. So for me, it became almost like a personal goal to see how my body will respond to competing at that level of snowboarding as I age because the sport can be pretty harsh and there can be a lot of impacts. Once I realised that I had to become more healthy in order to continue — when it comes to food, training, and everything going on in my mind — I started seeing so much potential and age didn’t matter anymore. It is a fun journey that I’m kind of creating on my own. There still aren’t that many snowboarders competing after their 20s.

How do you think your ego comes into play?

To be honest, it was probably eight or so years ago when I realised we had the term ‘ego’ and I started to contemplate it. I had certain sentiments and then thought, ‘wow, that’s my ego – that’s what it is.’ I was really lucky because my friends and I started a club and we called it ‘One Life’, which had the intention of being light-hearted in competition. A lot of people get really serious and their ego becomes very blatant and they don’t realise the impact. So ‘One Life’ tried to be aware of the ego. We intended to compete and have fun because isn’t that why we started doing this in the first place? We helped each other through this process and vowed to be a constant reminder to one another. We did silly things when we were younger like where animal hats – you know, you can’t get egotistical and be serious in an animal hat. Just try it. We had these little tools to help us to get through that phase and I think it is really important for people to reflect and look inside to remind themselves of what their ultimate motivation is. The more I learn about my ego, the more I’m able to see that I am unrestrained to be who I want to be. If at one point I did something I was not proud of, I can just shake it off and let it go.

Photo: Nikol Herec

Tips for keeping healthy and active, body and mind

We hosted a camp called ‘Presence Performance’ at Vassfjellet last January and will offer another in March. This was an all-day women’s snowboarding camp starting with yoga and meditation. The foundation of the camp is ‘face what brings yourself to its highest performance.’ If you want to be at the top of anything, the more present you are, the better you’ll be. This is something I have learned from the Olympics. Whenever I’ve done my best, it was because I was present. There are various techniques for breathing in the air, differentiating smell and sounds. We are also teaching participants what will give you the best fuel to perform the best. For me, it is very important to find a good balance between when I’m training and doing my thing, but also hosting things such as this camp. Because that is what really motivates me.

What does this region have to offer, what should they be proud about?

Be proud that you are growing up in a city that is surrounded by amazing forest and wildlife. Where else can you go less than five minutes outside of the city and go cross-country skiing and stay connected to nature? Deep down I think that this is why people in and around Trondheim have a lot of love in their hearts. I feel a lot of love. You don’t know everyone, but because of the size, you feel as if you could.

Quick Facts about Kjersti:     

  • Bronze medal at X Games Oslo 2016
  • 8th place for entire season, World Cup 2012/ 2013
  • Bronze medal at the Winter Olympics 2006
  • 4th place in half-pipe at the Winter Olympics 2002

Trondheimsreisen

The List’s contributor Zane Datava joined the crows for Kosmorama’s opening film yesterday. Here is what she had to say:

On Tuesday night after a sunny day in Trondheim, which brought a slight promise of spring, Prinsens Kino was filled with a cheerful atmosphere, plenty of marzipan cake, and loads of eager cinema lovers; regardless of the ice and snow on the streets.

No other opening film in the history of the Kosmorama has had so much attention surrounding it, as organisers mentioned before the film started. Almost all showings throughout the rest of the week are already sold out. To use the words of one of the narrators from the film: “what could be more exciting than to see ourselves”!

The film is full of love and appreciation for Trondhjem. It is colorful and nuanced and shows the city and its people through good times and bad, through struggles and joys. It is made from archived materials from Trondheim from 1906-1980 and illuminates the city through the stories of its people: Liv Ullmann, Odd Reitan, Håkon Bleken among others.

Highly recommended!

Warm Drinks for Cold Weather

Warm Drinks for Cold Weather

Not everyone wants to have a hot coffee beverage, and plain cocoa can get boring. Here are two alternatives that you can make with a few extra ingredients that can excite your taste buds, enchant your guests and give you something new to add to your holiday traditions. As well as a few tips from our friends at Jacobsen og Svart on how to brew a fantastic cup of coffee.

Photo: Jennifer Wold

Cinnamon Orange Cocoa – All things considered, these three flavours all go well together in different combinations. Together they are heavenly. This simple cocoa will amaze not only your nose but your taste buds too.

3 dl heavy cream

4 dl milk

3 tbs sugar
2 tsp cinnamon

50 g dark chocolate, chopped

zest of 1 orange

Heat the cream to a simmer, add chocolate and orange zest. Whisk until chocolate dissolves. Whisk in cinnamon and sugar, allow to dissolve. Slowly pour in milk and whisk until entire mixture is warm. Serve this with a dash of cinnamon and some shaved chocolate on the top.

Vanilla and Ginger Warm Apple Cider – Cider is very refreshing with its crisp fall apples. This takes that to a whole new level to warm even the coldest of fingers and noses.

1 litre apple cider (apple juice will work)

1 vanilla bean split and seeds scraped

1 tsp fresh ginger, grated

small cinnamon stick (a ½ tsp of ground cinnamon)

Heat the apple cider to a good simmer then reduce heat. Add the vanilla bean, ginger and cinnamon and heat for 15 minutes, giving it a good stir every few minutes. Strain the mixture to remove the ginger, cinnamon and vanilla bean pod. Serve immediately with a slice of apple, or store in a carafe to enjoy while out and about.

A perfect Coffee?

Any coffee, no matter how good the bean is, can become a bad cup of coffee. The coffee experts at Jacobsen og Svart want to help you make the most of your Christmas coffee.

Photo: Jennifer Wold

Kokekaffe (Kettle Coffee):
60g course ground coffee, as coarse as you can get it.

1 litre water, measured in a measuring cup

Boil your water in the kettle and remove from the heat. Once taken from the heat, pour in your grounds and give it a good stir. Never boil the grounds. Now, leave it for 8-10 minutes. Here is the magic tip: take the lid off and hit the edge of the kettle with a spoon and then be patient, the grounds will break and sink to the bottom, leaving you clear coffee to pour off into your cup.

Photo: Jennifer Wold

Filter Coffee:

60 g finer ground coffee, about the size of coffee crystals (not the fine ones)

1 litre of water, measured in a measuring cup

Start by rinsing your filter to remove the bitter taste that filters often give. Then measure your water for boiling, in a clean kettle. Pour in the water slowly to give it enough time to seep through the grounds.

One of the things to look for is that your grounds are damp, but not a soggy mess when it is done brewing.

Written by Jennifer Wold, this article originally appeared in Issue #19 of The List; read more here!

Skiing and Such

I think I read somewhere online that Norway did pretty well at the Winter Olympics (or just The Olympics as Norwegians call it). Cross-country skiing is part of Norwegian way of life, they’re born with skis on their feet, blah, blah, blah.

Watching all the action might have given you the boost you needed to get out there and glide on some snow, which we have a lot of currently. Here is a quick rundown on how to get out skiing like a local.

Photo: Anders Kallerud

WHERE TO GO

Trondheim, like a lot of places in Norway, is surrounded by areas to go skiing; take a look at this map that shows some of the options.

Bymarka, Granåsen, and Strindmarka are the usual destinations for city-dwellers and recommended by them as well. These stops are close by and easily accessed via bus. Though double check the schedule to make sure you have time to enjoy your day.

Photo: Anders Kallerud

To get out to Bymarka just hop on Bus 10 to Skistua and, bob’s your uncle, you’re there.

For Granåsen, also home of our beautiful ski jump, Bus 19 to Sandemoen is what you want, hop off at Granåsen VM-Anlegget.

And Strindmarka: Bus 5 or 66 up to Dragvoll will have you skiing in no time at all.

Bymarka is recommended to new skiers as it is the easiest (the flattest) track, but it has some breathtaking natural views. On the other hand, Strindamarka and especially Granåsen have plenty of ups and downs, then some more ups and downs making them better suited to those with some experience or great will, to challenge themselves. Granåsen is extra cool because of the stadium and lights along the rack, which can give you feel of competitive ski racing.

Photo: Wil Lee-Wright Photography

WHERE TO RENT GEAR

If you’re interested in playing in the snow, but don’t own the equipment, two options come immediately to mind.

The first is to get in touch with Trondheim Skiklubb and renting everything you need and picking it up at the conveniently located Skistua.

Trondheim Kommune also has several locations that loan out sporting equipment; from skis to canoes and backpacks.

WHAT TO BRING

The List recommends bringing snacks; no matter what activity you are doing, but skiing in particular. For the authentic experience pack a Kvikklunsj, and orange or clementine, and some hot chocolate or coffee.

For clothing: pack light, but warm. Especially this week as it is supposed to pretty darn cold.

Bring some friends, bring a date, your dog, your kids, or take a few laps around the track solo. Skiing can be enjoyed by everyone and in many different ways.

Photo: Sondre Hovda Dahlskaas

Skiing is not the easiest hobby to pick up; it requires a type of balance and movements that are not found in everyday life. So a smile and good sense of humour are also good things to pack along with you.

Checking in at Dwarfheim

Pineleaf Studios, featured in The List’s issue #19, is in the process of building a video game.

After The List spent some time peepin’ around their office, we started to be fascinated by how much work goes into creating a video game.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

When we last spoke to the guys and gals making Dwarfheim they were starting to enter some of the later stages of their games production, but to make the game run smoother and create a better experience they decided to rebuild the game with a more flexible framework they designed themselves.

Already they are back on track, and even ahead of schedule. The world they are building, and the characters that will inhabit it are looking stunning.

They gave us a first look at the Berserker character.

Image: Pineleaf Studio

 

After wandering around, looking over the shoulders of the game designers, artists, and others involved in the company it was incredible seeing how all the pieces come together. From turning sketches into 3D pieces of art, to coding and creating the way characters move.

 

Photo: Pineleaf Studio

The majority of the technical terms went over our heads, but a discussion with Fredrik Chrislock really stood out. He talked about implementing artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning into Dwarfheim – taking technology from other fields and bringing it into the gaming industry. The game will learn from the way humans play the game and make changes to keep things fresh and exciting.

Everyone at Dwarfheim had a lot to say about their game and the goals they want to accomplish with it.

“We want to create deep and innovative games. Looking at the game industry right now, we think there are a lot of things that are still untried”, Hans Klevin, the big man at Pineleaf Studios said.

The video game industry in Norway, and especially in Trondheim, is rapidly evolving. The List will certainly be following the progress of Pineleaf Studios and Dwarfheim!

Trondheim Calling: Day 2

Trondheim Calling: Day 2

The List made a hip-hop night out of the second day of the festival.

It might be because I’m a millennial, or perhaps it has something to do with my cookie-cutter, suburban upbringing, but I’m always looking forward to a night of rap and hip-hop. Diskoteket’s entire line-up last night was just that, so The List decided to post up and catch all four shows at the nightlife spot of the year according to Adressa.

We pulled up to the spot just as the doors opened in order to grab some seating, and it wasn’t long before people started filtering in.

First up was Turab, an artist coming from Manglerud in the Oslo area. From the get-go, he had great energy on the stage. The beats, which he produced himself, were solid and even got the Norwegian crowd to start bobbing their heads. Lyrically I followed along as best I could and liked what I heard ­– Turab delivered with good flow and varied subject matters. The List is looking forward to Turab’s return to Trondheim.

Turab, Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

After a short break, the next man on stage was Ganezha. It was an enjoyable show, and Ganezha’s kit was certainly the wildest! His music was simple and mellow, keeping up the good vibes for the whole evening.

Next up was one of the heavy hitters of the evening: Emir. I was familiar with Emir as half of the duo $ushi x Kobe, which played in Trondheim during UKA this past fall. People seemed eager to catch another act from Emir, as Diskoteket was packed to the walls before the first beat dropped.

Emir, Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

The set was tight, and with most of the shows at Trondheim Calling it was over all too quickly. The crowd was eating up what Emir was setting in front of them and it led to a great energy in Diskoteket.

Trondheim’s own Gerald Ofori closed the stage down last night. After hearing a heavy amount of hype about this dude in the months and weeks leading up to Trondheim Calling I was excited to see what it was all about.

Gerald Ofori, Photo: Torelif Kvinnesland

I would say that the hype was worth it. Gerald put on a great performance live, with some outstanding beats and catchy lyrics. After his show last night I think there will be a number of people keeping an eye out for more from Gerald.

All throughout the night people were filtering in and out, some would stick around for a show or two and jet off to another venue. It was cool to see the different ways people experience Trondheim Callings massive amount of concerts and flowing through MidtByen – a strategy worth adopting tonight to squeeze out the most of this last evening of Trondheim Calling.