Meet Your Makers: Wiralcam

Eivind Sæter, CDO of Wiralcam

– When did you start and what gave you the inspiration to start your cable cam system?

I have always loved filming, but only at an amateur level when I go on vacation, and visiting new and beautiful places. To be able to show the best moments to family and friends when I get home is great.

Almost three years ago I was about to get married. I wanted to document the wedding in the same way as my vacations and started to look for a tool to do this in a good way. I thought it would be great to get some smooth shots, close to the action, but most of the tools were either too expensive or had limiting functionality. Cable cams were the obvious choice, but only high-end products existed on the market. I decided to create my own, and this lead to the idea behind Wiral LITE.

Photo courtesy of Wiralcam

– Do you consider yourself a ‘maker’? What do you do with the rest of your time and what is your background making things (digital or analogue)?

Yes, I do. I love to make things, and I am always thinking about new ideas. The problem is to have time to do something with them. Being an entrepreneur is perfect, then I can work with the ideas I believe in every day.

I have a master’s degree in industrial design and believe that the education and the design thinking help me bring the ideas to life. To be a maker, it is important to know a little bit of everything. You do not necessarily need to be an expert in one specific area, but rather be able to see the whole picture.

Photo courtesy of Wiralcam

– Tell us a little more about the product: what makes it unique, where it is made and any special techniques?

Wiral is a camera accessory where you can remotely control a camera along a rope to get dynamic footage. The existing cable cam systems are outdated and for professionals only, demanding hours to set-up and multiple people to operate. Wiral fits easily in your backpack and can be operated by a five-year-old. The system comes with an intuitive attachment system, making it easy for anyone to set it up in less than 3 minutes. This patent-pending attachment solution is what truly differentiates us from competing solutions.

Wiral was founded in 2016 by four outdoor and filming enthusiasts who saw the need for adding a new perspective while capturing own adventures. The team has now expanded to 9 people, and most of the product development is happening in-house in the offices in Trondheim.

– What has the area of Trøndelag brought to your making? Could this be possible anywhere else? Would it look different if it was?

Trondheim has a great start-up scene, and several start-ups have already created successful camera gear. To be able to learn from these start-ups has been essential to our success. Also, to be close to NTNU and able to recruit great engineers from a leading technical university is really unique for Trondheim.

Photo Courtesy of Wiralcam

– And the something unique to the product/people behind Wiral you wouldn’t necessarily know?
While cable cameras run on steel wires, Wiral LITE runs on a thin static rope usually used for sailing and kitesurfing. Creative solutions like this evolve because our team consists of people with background from kitesurfing, climbing and downhill biking. We have managed to take some great elements from sports, like the rope, and apply it to a completely different product and market.  

– And finally, info for people who would like to know more about or to buy the product etc., where are you online?

Pre-ordering Wiral LITE now before we start shipping will save you 40%, so I definitely recommend that. You can find more information about specs, example footage and user testimonials on www.wiralcam.com.

 

 

Meet Your Makers: Flora Norwegica

Flora Norwegica

This weeks maker is Ceramist Tovelise Røkke-Olsen who, with her friend Mona Sprenger, is bringing back a centuries-old pottery tradition.

The Flora Norwegica is a vase that you won’t find anywhere else in the world. It is handmade with a unique glaze and a distinctly Scandinavian style. Each one is one of a kind!

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

Did you study ceramics at school?

I did, at Statens Kunst og Arbeidskole, which is now called something else, and I finished with that back in 1983.

What did you do after studying?

I was down in Oslo for 20 years, until 2003, working with ceramics and sculpture the whole time – with a few extra jobs on the side to make money. Then moved back to Trondheim.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

Tell us about Flora Norwegica.

It is an extremely old tradition to use. There used to be a number of factories in Trondheim that worked in the same style, but now there is none – only me.

Mona:

It all started with a green ceramic plate and a green, perforated lump. It was all that was left at a flea market at Bøler in Oslo. I brought it home.

The plate’s label said Graveren. After a bit of research, I discovered that it probably was designed by Ragnar Grimsrud. He was the artist manager for Graveren Tegleverk in Sandnes, Norway in the thirties.

One day a friend who works as a curator at the National Museum in Oslo paid me a visit. She told me that the whole story began at the Dutch court during the famous tulip mania of the 1630s. During this period the vase “Tulipere” was created. The vase had multiple holes where the stems could be inserted. It made a splash among the privileged few of the upper class who could afford the precious flower. At its peak, the price for a single tulip onion could be ten times that of what a skilled craftsman would earn in a year.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

Did you have any guide to get started?

No, just started trying. I started trying it one way, but quickly found a more practical way to do it that is probably more like the traditional method.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

How do you think the Trondheim art scene is? 

It is a very small environment here, but there is a good amount of fantastic artists. With ceramics, it’s a little difficult as there isn’t much education for it here. You find a little bit more down in Bergen and Oslo, but some people are coming back to Trondheim.

What is the best part about creating it?

Its very fun to work with, since its two parts, there is a lot of form and composition that you can work with. It supposed to be fun to make, so I’m always experimenting with different ways to form and glaze and everything.

It’s also fun to play with what you put in the vases, whether its flowers or random things you pick up out of the grass on your way home. You can keep things around as long as you want and change it when you want, it’s very fun.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

Find out more:

Keep an eye out at Scandic hotels for some of Tovelise’s work!

Check out Flora Norwegica’s Facebook, right here, and Instagram for fantastic photos of the work, and to find out when you can take your own vase home!

Meet Your Makers: Easy Intervals

Product: Easy Intervals
Maker: Erik Hjertholm, CEO, and Founder of Easy Intervals

Photo courtesy of Easy Intervals

– When did you start and what gave you the inspiration to create your product? 

The idea behind Easy Intervals came when I was doing my previous master’s degree. The thesis we wrote was very big and challenging and it made it hard to find time to work out. I then started doing a lot of research into what’s the most efficient way of staying in shape, and I was quite disappointed when I discovered that High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) was the answer, as I really hate interval training.

There is a ton of research proving that Interval training is one of the best things you can do for your body, but there are so many things you have to pay attention to while doing it, and it’s really hard to find the right resistance to keep you in the different zones you’re supposed to be in, as well as figuring out what type of interval you should do. I decided to find a solution to these problems combining what I already knew about electronics and automation with the latest research on the topic.

– Do you consider yourself a ‘maker’? Do you make other things outside of this? 

I would definitely consider myself a maker. As long as I can remember I have opened things and put them together in new ways to solve some kind of problem I had. Like when I was a kid my older brother didn’t wake up from his alarm, but I did. I took some parts from the garage and an electric motor and made a contraption that shock his whole bed in the morning. It worked like a charm, and I was never bothered by his alarm again. I must have made hundreds of small contraptions like this, and although most of them were merely a curiosity or something just for fun, it thought me a lot about how to make stuff and this has helped me a lot in developing Easy Intervals.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

– Tell us a little more about the product: what makes it unique, where it is made and any special techniques? 

We decided to make a system for exercise bikes first, and after a lot of prototyping, hundreds of 3D-prints and consultation with doctors, exercise scientists, physiotherapists and professors in cybernetics and automation, we now have a working prototype as well as a letter of intent from a potential customer in the field of physiotherapy.

It really makes for a whole new experience when it comes to interval training, as it tackles all the negative aspects of it. It doesn’t matter if you’re a top athlete or have never worked out before as it automatically adjusts itself to your individual fitness level and takes care of everything during the whole workout, even how fast you should pedal. One of the best features of the system is that although it makes sure you reach the required heart rate that is needed, it actually won’t allow you to do more than what is necessary. Intervals really can’t get any easier than this, and I’ve actually started to like them!

– What has the area of Trøndelag bring to your making? Could this be possible anywhere else? Would it look different if it was? 

The development of Easy Intervals would have been really hard to do anywhere else than here. The combination of scientists at the Cardiac Exercise Research Group (CERG) at St Olavs Hospital, professors and experts at NTNU and maker spaces like the Omega workshop supplied both the necessary knowledge and means to develop something like this. It really is a multidisciplinary project that requires expertise in many different fields, and all of them can be found right here.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

– And is there something unique to the people behind it and outsider wouldn’t necessarily know, but is cool?

We are extremely stubborn! Not many people know how much effort is required to start a new company, but it is challenging in every way imaginable as you have to learn everything at once and make hard decisions every day. This requires a dedication and stubbornness you don´t find in most people. Although starting a company undoubtedly is really hard, it is also the most rewarding thing I have ever done, so it kind of balances out.

Where can we find you online?

Our website is easy-intervals.com

Meet Your Makers: Spætt Film

For this week’s edition of Meet Your Makers, The List stopped by the Spætt Film office to talk to director Magnus Skatvold and CEO/Co-Producer Håvard Gosse about their recent hit film: Trondheimsreisen. They premiered the documentary during Kosmorama International Film Festival this past March and received great acclaim.

For those that missed it during Kosmorama, or those wanting to see it a second time, the film is still currently in theatres.

Peep the trailer:How did you first become interested in film?

Magnus:

For me, it very much so has been a lifelong passion. I’ve been a film-buff since my childhood and I have kind of known from the time

Photo courtesy of Spætt FIlm

I was 10 or 11 that at some point I was going to work with film; either has an actor or director. I was just fascinated with the world of film.

– Any movie in particular?

I think Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2 was one of the first films I saw in the cinema, probably a little too young to see it, but that was just such a profound experience for me.

 

Håvard:

I like to tell a fun story which is when I was born my parents were out at the cinema; watching To Menn for En Baby. I wanted to get out and spoil this horrible film for them…I don’t know if they’ve ever watched it again.

Photo courtesy of Spætt Film

Then my plan was to be an engineer, but I always borrowed my dad’s camera to film little clips. Then I studied math, chemistry, and physics at university and got some extra points for that which got me into my dream course: the film course at NTNU. So thanks to me trying to be an engineer I got into the film class and its grown from there!

 

 

 

Where did the project of Trondheimsreisen come from?

Magnus:

This project had been in development for about a year before we got attached to it. Trondheim Cinema and the producer were in talks about putting to use some the many kilometers of films stock they had stored. And that began the process of what it should be used for, whether a documentary or something else.

We got approached to take a look at the material and got involved in the process. Then we started with interviews, for research and for something we could use in the film. So we started with interesting storytellers in Trondheim, not necessarily famous people, but ones that had personal and historical stories to tell.

Håvard:

We are really happy that Dag Hoel came to us with this project. As we said he had been developing something with Trondheim Kino, but then he needed a storyteller to come on board. Dag Hoel is one of the all-timers here in Trondheim; he’s been producing for many, many years. He knows me from previous work we have done together and of course, Magnus was on his radar as well for being one of the young, new directors from the region that has a lot of experience. So it was well timed that he came to Magnus for the director position.

Magnus:

The dynamic between the producer and myself was very good for the project. We had different views on materials and experience and two voices to tell the story. This resulted in, mainly, positive discussions on the what the story is and could be – which is so broad as we are telling the story of Trondheim over the course of 100 years.

How long did it take to complete the film?

Magnus:

We were contacted about the film about two years ago. The process started there, and while it hasn’t been full time, I’ve spent several hours a week, every week on it for the past two years. It was a lot of different processes, one being getting a hold of all the material and looking through it – which takes hours and hours. You also have to think about it and let it sink in and start to build a story in your head.

There is also the process of editing it all together that started very early on. Within the first month, I started editing together little scenes and trying to get a hold of the style I wanted to use.

Choosing the footage was quite intuitive in a sense. I had done a couple of interviews that were very open, just sitting down with people for an hour or two talking about their lives with no clear agenda. I just wanted to get as much openness as possible, and people ended up using me almost like a therapist. They were talking about things they hadn’t thought about in 10-20 years; people were opening up and crying. I think there is something that happens when people speak to someone half their age or younger starts asking about their lives. How was it being in love during this time or that? What was it like experiencing the war? That gave me a lot to work with.

How was the process compared to your previous work?

Magnus:

This project is very special because we had to find a way of doing it, almost inventing a new way of thinking. The story we were telling isn’t linear where you have a script and just need to follow that. All the materials we had, from the footage, the interviews, and even the sound design was influencing each other. It was after the interviews that I really knew what to look for in the material and footage we had, but also it worked the other way and the material gave me ideas about what to ask people during the interviews.

Håvard:

The only mainframe we really had to guide the process of creating the film was that it started with this shot from 1906 and the ending using footage from the 1980’s. Most people would have organized the film to have it all in chronological order, but Magnus managed to find some kind of fluctuating way to tell the story that still makes it feel like it is going from one point to another. Which is a much more interesting film, I think.

Magnus:

It was a challenge because it needed some structure. The film is chronological in a way that it starts one way and ends more modern in some parts, but it takes some liberties in jumping between decades in ways we felt it was necessary to tell the story. We see the timeline as not only chronological but where do you place something like being a student at NTNU into a specific time period? We wanted to tell things like that, like being a student, as some broader. That we could mix clips from the 1940’s or 60’s or 80’s and that things are very much the same, but also has its differences.

How long did it take to look through all that footage?

Magnus:

Our material came from a lot of sources, from the national library, Studentersammfundet, NRK, and even regular people sending us film from their own collections.

That footage isn’t the same type of quality like some of the stuff from NRK, but having those private moments from real Trondheimer’s became the soul of the film.

Håvard:

We bought a machine to digitize the film ourselves but quickly found out that it wasn’t enough. We could use it to watch through the film but had to send it to a specialist to digitalize it. But its great as now all the footage is being sent to the National Library to be stored and is great for documenting our history.

How was the premiere?

Håvard:

It was awesome for us. I was sitting next to two musicians that have a song in the film and overheard them talking about how they were touched by the film along with everyone else. Everyone was talking about their own experiences in the city, and that was great to hear.

We had people coming up and telling us that they were never going to leave Trondheim again!

Magnus:

It was an overwhelming experience. I’d seen the film 10-20 times already, but it really came alive seeing it with a large audience. It was definitely a high point in my professional life – presenting it with Liv Ullmann of all people and getting such positive feedback from the audience. I had people coming up to me that I didn’t know to thank me for making the film.

We knew of course that this would be popular amongst the older generations of people in Trondheim, but it has shown itself to be more of a cross-generational film and bringing people together.

What’s next?

Magnus:

After Trondheimsreisen it was very good to go back to doing more short-term projects. Also working with the documentary ‘Blue Code of Silence’ [A documentary film about the story of the infamous NYPD officer Bob Leuci] and hopefully we will get some more answers on that in the coming months.

Håvard:

We [Spætt Films] have a short film that is being made with Vegard [Dahle] as director. He made the film ‘Eye’ last year, which won the 72-hour competition at the Jinzhen International Short Film Festival in China last year. We are making a behind-the-scenes movie on that as well. We also have a few feature films that are in development.

Keep an eye out for much more from Spætt films in the future. With some exciting documentaries, fiction films, and entertaining commercials currently in the works. Check out some more of their past, current, and future projects here!

Also stay tuned to TheList.no for a few film suggestions from these two!

Meet your Makers: TinaTing

In the latest volume of The List Magazine, we took a look at some men and women who make stuff in Trondheim. Here, we’d like to introduce Tina Bugge of TinaTing and her beautiful origami artwork. Check out the article in the magazine and enjoy this full interview!

When did you start and what gave you the inspiration to start your business?

I have always liked working with my hands, I’m a very tactile person, with a knack for details. I used to work full time with really practical, minute operations as a staff engineer at NTNU, but with more administrative tasks and less time in the lab, I needed to keep my hands busy.

I started the webshop TinaTing on the marketplace Epla.no at the end of a maternity leave in the summer of 2011. TinaTing is all about eye candy. Either with regards to origami pictures, origami diamonds, origami lamps, or button jewelry. I have come up with a technique where I cover buttons with paper, and then turn them into jewelry like earrings, brooches, rings or cufflinks. This is rather time-consuming, so there is less time for that, unfortunately. Enter origami! Almost instant satisfaction! The metallic paper is an inspiration in itself. It will sparkle when the light hits it at different angles. Origami is all about folding and angles, so I would say it is a perfect match! Some would argue the metallic paper is too tough to fold, but I like it a bit al dente. For instance, if the paper it too light, a PHiZZ-orb for a lamp will fall apart. The lamp is made of 30 identical pieces put together with no glue. Watching a lamp slowly coming apart just from its own weight is strange.

I was invited to join the design collective Sukker in April 2015, and I am still honoured they asked me! The designers there are really an inspiring crowd to hang with. Having an actual store where you can present and sell your things, and meet people who appreciate your design is awesome. Every designer takes a turn to work in the shop. If I hear someone in the shop for instance say – I like that PRSM-picture, but would like it in another colour -, then I can offer to make it. Making pieces which go well with the other designers’ products is also cool. Lise of Miniminuskel and I are making matching dresses of different materials; she makes petite ones for girls, while I fold paper versions. Together they make great presents!

Do you consider yourself a ‘maker’? What do you do with the rest of your time and what is your background making things?

I do indeed consider myself a maker. I like to make eye candy and am easily mesmerized by lovely colours, and especially paper. But nice paper is hard to find in Norway, so I make an effort finding paper online or whenever I travel. With Norwegian import taxes, and sky-rocketing shipping fares it is challenging, but all the more fun when you can make a bargain or a good deal! And somehow along this way, I also ended up becoming the Norwegian retailer for a Canadian paper distributor of Japanese chiyogami paper.

I work full time as a staff engineer at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, I am a mom of two, and a member of the design community Sukker. Besides that, I will fold whenever and wherever, just ask whoever. I always carry paper in my bag, and will fold in planes, trains, automobiles, sofas, parks….

I used to work more hands-on in the lab at NTNU, but with less time in the lab now, I need to keep my hands busy, and origami is perfect! The repetitive folding is like meditation. The joy of creating something beautiful from a flat sheet of paper is just awesome! And building something with modules is amazing, especially if you really couldn’t wrap your head around the instructions in the first place! I still have a piece at home that I really struggled with, that I can’t reproduce. I cannot remember how I did it or crack the code. Really frustrating!

I will never make drawings before making anything. The paper itself is the inspiration. These days are mostly about making beautiful dresses and shirts for cards.

Photo Courtesy of TinaTing

Tell us a little more about the product: what makes it unique, where it is made and any special techniques?

I think people can tell when it is a TinaTing. I am all about straight lines and edges. If it is not a right angle, it is a wrong angle. Sloppy origami is irritating. Colour coordinating is also fun. When making the origami pictures I will sometimes throw the pieces around on the table, and then maybe an unlikely colour combo will appear. The PRSM-pictures are maybe the “most” TinaTing I make.

I am a self-taught origamist and have never invented any origami designs myself. I am in awe of the people who are able to think up the original diagrams!! I will learn new techniques from YouTube rather than from a book. See one, do one, teach one. So why is my stuff special/different from others? I would say the presentation/the whole package; the precision, the materials, and the colour combinations. I have nice paper! I leave nothing to chance (or sometimes everything, it could, seem…). I deliver a complete product, all the way down to the packaging.

What has the area of Trøndelag bring to your making? Could this be possible anywhere else? Would it look different if it was?

I am a native Trønder from Trondheim, so I’ve never left! The size of Trondheim, with the “closeness” to everything, makes it perfect. You can walk or bike to almost anywhere, and the community of designers is very inspiring and including. Being a native Trønder means many of the people I grew up with are still around, thus I can ask them for help, more so than if I was from outside Trondheim. Knowing people at NTNU and the workshops at St.Olav has come in handy in my creative work as well. It is not all about what you know, but who you know. This keeps coming back to me. I would never be this successful in Oslo, as I have no such basic network there. Being an introvert and a creative exhibitionist is hard when you want to sell your stuff. I have been very fortunate, and I feel I have taken the opportunities that have been given and did the most with them.

Photo Courtesy of TinaTing

And the something unique to you and the product we wouldn’t necessarily know?

I may have it all covered? I am also working on outdoor origami. The weather in Trøndelag isn’t always sunny, so I have made PHiZZ-balls that can be placed in the garden. Where I live it will roll around in the garden in the wind. Looking forward to letting it play in the grass again.

And finally, info for people who would like to know more about or to buy the product etc., where are you online?

Instagram would be the most up to date place to find me: @tinabugge.

Facebook: TinaTing 

Artwork and origami paper can be found here.

In person: In Trondheim, the store Sukker, in Bakklandet, is the best place to find my stuff.

And if you are in Oslo you can find TinaTings at Skaperverket in Grünerløkka.