Warm Drinks for Cold Weather

Warm Drinks for Cold Weather

Not everyone wants to have a hot coffee beverage, and plain cocoa can get boring. Here are two alternatives that you can make with a few extra ingredients that can excite your taste buds, enchant your guests and give you something new to add to your holiday traditions. As well as a few tips from our friends at Jacobsen og Svart on how to brew a fantastic cup of coffee.

Photo: Jennifer Wold

Cinnamon Orange Cocoa – All things considered, these three flavours all go well together in different combinations. Together they are heavenly. This simple cocoa will amaze not only your nose but your taste buds too.

3 dl heavy cream

4 dl milk

3 tbs sugar
2 tsp cinnamon

50 g dark chocolate, chopped

zest of 1 orange

Heat the cream to a simmer, add chocolate and orange zest. Whisk until chocolate dissolves. Whisk in cinnamon and sugar, allow to dissolve. Slowly pour in milk and whisk until entire mixture is warm. Serve this with a dash of cinnamon and some shaved chocolate on the top.

Vanilla and Ginger Warm Apple Cider – Cider is very refreshing with its crisp fall apples. This takes that to a whole new level to warm even the coldest of fingers and noses.

1 litre apple cider (apple juice will work)

1 vanilla bean split and seeds scraped

1 tsp fresh ginger, grated

small cinnamon stick (a ½ tsp of ground cinnamon)

Heat the apple cider to a good simmer then reduce heat. Add the vanilla bean, ginger and cinnamon and heat for 15 minutes, giving it a good stir every few minutes. Strain the mixture to remove the ginger, cinnamon and vanilla bean pod. Serve immediately with a slice of apple, or store in a carafe to enjoy while out and about.

A perfect Coffee?

Any coffee, no matter how good the bean is, can become a bad cup of coffee. The coffee experts at Jacobsen og Svart want to help you make the most of your Christmas coffee.

Photo: Jennifer Wold

Kokekaffe (Kettle Coffee):
60g course ground coffee, as coarse as you can get it.

1 litre water, measured in a measuring cup

Boil your water in the kettle and remove from the heat. Once taken from the heat, pour in your grounds and give it a good stir. Never boil the grounds. Now, leave it for 8-10 minutes. Here is the magic tip: take the lid off and hit the edge of the kettle with a spoon and then be patient, the grounds will break and sink to the bottom, leaving you clear coffee to pour off into your cup.

Photo: Jennifer Wold

Filter Coffee:

60 g finer ground coffee, about the size of coffee crystals (not the fine ones)

1 litre of water, measured in a measuring cup

Start by rinsing your filter to remove the bitter taste that filters often give. Then measure your water for boiling, in a clean kettle. Pour in the water slowly to give it enough time to seep through the grounds.

One of the things to look for is that your grounds are damp, but not a soggy mess when it is done brewing.

Written by Jennifer Wold, this article originally appeared in Issue #19 of The List; read more here!