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FotballFeber: A Conversation with Endre Forbord

Content sponsored by FotballFeber

Endre Forbord is a portrait, lifestyle and advertising photographer educated at Norsk Fotofagskole. This summer he’s in charge of Football Fever (Fotballfeber) Trondheim 2018! We had a chat with him about this summer’s biggest event in the city.

Photo: Endre Forbord

What is Football Fever?
We will show all the matches from the 2018 World Cup in Russia, starting with Russia versus Saudi Arabia on June 14. The tournament lasts for a month and culminates with the final at July 15. The whole event has free entrance, so everyone is welcome to enjoy this huge football festival in front of a 60 square meters screen at Festningen. We have seats for 4000 people, but there is plenty of extra room for everyone who wants! And of course, we got loads of food and drinks!! You can basically live up there for a month. We will be Trondheim’s biggest outdoor restaurant this summer.

Is there an age limit?

No, this is for football fans of all ages – and of course, we welcome everyone who doesn’t care for the football to enjoy themselves with friends, food, and drinks. There will be different activities throughout the period for both kids and grown-ups! Just beside the area where it all takes place, there will be different activities where you can have fun for hours. Bring the whole family, we can assure great fun for everyone! I can reveal that the world champions in freestyle football, Fagerli Brothers, is having a show for us at the end of the group stage. There will also be a tricks school, freestyle battle and maybe even a world record attempt!

What made you decide to do this huge festival?

Big challenges attract me – and this is such a big challenge that I couldn’t let the opportunity pass. I’ve never done something on this scale before, over a whole month. I must be out of my mind really! But seriously, I can’t imagine a better feeling than giving thousands of people a positive experience through the World Cup this summer. I hear friends talk about their first World Cup and the best World Cup they’ve witnessed. This encourages me to make this World Cup the best for everyone! I feel the goosebumps on my skin just by thinking about it. It truly means a lot to me that I get this chance!

What about your football interest in general?

I have somewhat of an interest, but my level of knowledge is poor. It’s growing on me though! Working with the World Cup really gives me a lot of new information and knowledge. It’s a unique way for me to learn more and take an even bigger interest in the future. I’m really hyped about the World Cup and I can’t wait to follow it through.

So, do you have a favourite player in the tournament?

Ole Selnæs. No, I’m just joking, my favourite player is Carlos Bacca. He is playing for Colombia and I hear they are a fun team to watch. 

What was the first World Cup you have a relation to?

Oh, that was the one in 2008! Was that a World Cup? No, it was in 2010! I was part of an event on Blæst (RIP) where we showed the World Cup in South Africa. That was a lot of fun with a lot of happy trøndere enjoying themselves.

What can we look forward to at the beginning of the World Cup?

We can definitely look forward the opening weekend starting this Thursday with the hosting nation Russia taking on Saudi Arabia. On Friday, we get the first real treat of the tournament when Cristiano Ronaldo and Portugal face Andres Iniesta and Spain. It’s definitely going to be a full house this evening.

What happens if the area is full?

If we’re full, we’re full. It’s unfortunate if someone doesn’t get to sit, but there is a way to secure a spot for you and your friends. We have a system where you can book a table up front so that you can skip the line and walk straight to your designated table in front of the big screen. There is already a lot of reservations so for example if you want to have a good view on the big game on Friday, you better get to it sooner rather than later! We have a 50% cut on tables for the opening weekend, so this is guaranteed to be a historic kick-off to Football Fever Trondheim 2018!

Is there something you want to add?

Yes actually, there will be something called BigOne Hour. We will be giving out free pizzas for everyone who wants for an hour every day in the opening weekend. It’s going to be wild!

There are also some days without a game in the playoffs. Here we will have other types of events like the Flashback Summer Festival on July 12. Join our event “Fotballfeber Trondheim 2018” on Facebook for more information in the coming days and weeks. All I can say now is welcome to Trondheim’s biggest football festival ever!

 

Trønder Bunad

Seaming Together A Region: The Trønder Bunad

Words by Jennifer Wold

Photo: Linda Kathrine Hogstad

Fun fact: The first 17th of May parade was started right here in Trondheim. It took place in Ilevollen in 1827 with a little over 1000 participants.

The word bunad most frequently conjures up images of women and men seen in their national dress at confirmations, parades and events on the 17th of May. The lively colours of embroidered hems, men’s vests tucked under darker jackets and gleaming silver are hard to miss.

It doesn’t take more than a glance to see that they are beautiful and come in many styles. But from the exterior one may never guess, unless one knows, just how complex each is or how much work goes into them. The concept of bunads is much like one’s hands; we all have them, although each a bit different. But when you really look into each individual bunad you realise they are more like fingerprints; unique to the wearer in every way. They are custom fit and, at Husfliden, completely hand-sewn. Each region is responsible for producing their particular bunad. You will not find a bunad from Oppland made here, as much as you would not find a Trønder bunad made there.

Photo: Linda Kathrine Hogstad

In Trøndelag way back in 1920, Ragna Rytter, Kaspara Kyllingstad and Ingebord Krokstad set out to create a unified Trønderbunad. They never found a full bunad, but they used drawings and paintings done by Dreyer in 1775 to gain a better understanding of the materials and styles they would need. They gathered samples of embroidery, linen shirts, trousers and skirts, and the fabrics common to the area of the time and those inherited over the years. These pieces of local folk costumes were the starting points. Traditions in wool, weaving and embroidery were carefully considered.

Three years after starting their project they collected enough to start sewing the first Trønderbunad. It wasn’t until the 1960s that the Rococo and Trøndelag-wide inspired garment we know today emerged.

One of the biggest trademarks of the women’s bunad is the rose pattern damask brocade bodice. The layers are carefully pressed, pinned and stitched by the hands of skilled artisans. They are trained in their craft and when watching their nimble fingers create delicate inner seams with a peek of brocade or taking a close look at the cuff of a shirt to see tiny pleats and smaller, fine embroidery quietly reveals this is more than making a garment. The construction of this bodice is nothing short of spectacular and all hand sewn, be it the panels of the peplum or the cording into the contrasting wool edging. Many of the embroidered pieces are done by the hands of local women who add their expertise and talents to every bunad.

Photo: Linda Kathrine Hogstad

In quick passing one might never see the details on the white undershirt or white linen headscarf. Stitch placement is carefully counted to form the intricate patterns that one could mistake for being woven. Particularly on the Skautet, or head scarf, the border is intricately done to create an open lacework. In contrast to the tight and fine stitches gracing the

Photo: Linda Kathrine Hogstad

crisp linen shirts, bold and richly dyed wool make up the embroidery that embosses the black silk bonnets, waist purses and shawl. Patterns from Kosberg, Selbu and Singsås grace the bonnets. Gauldal, Soknedal and Tidal are on show on the waist purses.

 

Men’s bunads are no less intricate than their female counterparts. Just on the inside of the jacket you can see a perfectly spaced whip stitch, a strip of soft leather supporting the buttons and button holes both strengthened and embellished by stitches wrapping tight the edges of the fine wool. The waistcoat is bold with woven details in contrasting colours and gleaming buttons bearing the Trøndersk rose. At the neck, a silk scarf with bright colours shows off its damask pattern.

Photo: Linda Kathrine Hogstad

One might think that black knickers would be a rather simple garment, but again the same details of fine stitching lead down to hand-knit wool socks deftly held up by woven garters. Even the knitted hat has a tradition all its own. The young should only be seen in all red, the young man in a red hat with a black cuff and the married man in a black hat with a red cuff. Also, these hats should only be combined with a dark outer jacket. Every piece is carefully considered to give a dapper and polished air.

In contrast to the rich wools, silks and fine linen is the shining polish of crisp silver. Adorning the collars, waist coasts, bodices, ears and purses are locally made symbols of Trøndelag. Engraving and styles speak more to north or south, as do the rings, the spoked wheel effect and the intricate clasps. The slightest movement causes a little tinkle as the delicate components touch. In the sun, they glimmer and sparkle to make their presence known. Often these are handed down, but whether a family heirloom or a newer piece, these pieces of jewellery are closely looked after.

Photo: Linda Kathrine Hogstad

Whether you are a curious visitor or transplant to Norway, or as Norwegian as the day is long, find the time to closely examine these perfect examples of what it truly means to be ‘Made in Trøndelag”.

Ladehammer/Barnehammer

Ladehammer/Barnehammer

Words by Bradley Kurtz

Photo: Sturle Dagsland

Ladehammerfestivalen: a music festival for a good cause, held at the best venue in Trondheim. Ladehammerfestivalen is held at, well, the Ladehammer – complete with spectacular views of the city and Trondheimsfjorden to the West.

This unique and fun festival prides itself on being put on for no other reason than to give the people of Trondheim a good time and give voice to a good cause. This year the festival is in cooperation with Sjiraffen Kultursenter, which offers cultural, and leisure activities for children, adolescents, and adults with mental and physical disabilities.

Each year the lineup of bands playing at the festival becomes more and more varied. 2018 will see an eclectic group of punk, reggae, surf-rock, stoner-core, and of course, Trøndersk rock, take the stage below the Ladehammer. Every year Ladehammerfestivalen works to promote some of the up-and-coming bands in the region via Ladehammerslag, a battle of the band’s style event. Stop by to discover and cheer on your new favourite.

Kids are welcome to Ladehammerfestivalen as well! Starting at noon on Saturday there will be kid-friendly programs and a picnic – aptly dubbed Barnehammer’n.

Don’t worry about trying to scramble to buy tickets to Ladehammerfestivalen, as it is free to attend. Everyone from the bands to the festival manager volunteers their time to put on a great show.

Date: 8-9 June

Locations: Ladehammer

Time: 18:00 for Ladehammer, 12:00 for Barnehammern

Price: Free

Extra Information: http://www.ladehammerfestivalen.no/

Meet Your Makers: Wiralcam

Eivind Sæter, CDO of Wiralcam

– When did you start and what gave you the inspiration to start your cable cam system?

I have always loved filming, but only at an amateur level when I go on vacation, and visiting new and beautiful places. To be able to show the best moments to family and friends when I get home is great.

Almost three years ago I was about to get married. I wanted to document the wedding in the same way as my vacations and started to look for a tool to do this in a good way. I thought it would be great to get some smooth shots, close to the action, but most of the tools were either too expensive or had limiting functionality. Cable cams were the obvious choice, but only high-end products existed on the market. I decided to create my own, and this lead to the idea behind Wiral LITE.

Photo courtesy of Wiralcam

– Do you consider yourself a ‘maker’? What do you do with the rest of your time and what is your background making things (digital or analogue)?

Yes, I do. I love to make things, and I am always thinking about new ideas. The problem is to have time to do something with them. Being an entrepreneur is perfect, then I can work with the ideas I believe in every day.

I have a master’s degree in industrial design and believe that the education and the design thinking help me bring the ideas to life. To be a maker, it is important to know a little bit of everything. You do not necessarily need to be an expert in one specific area, but rather be able to see the whole picture.

Photo courtesy of Wiralcam

– Tell us a little more about the product: what makes it unique, where it is made and any special techniques?

Wiral is a camera accessory where you can remotely control a camera along a rope to get dynamic footage. The existing cable cam systems are outdated and for professionals only, demanding hours to set-up and multiple people to operate. Wiral fits easily in your backpack and can be operated by a five-year-old. The system comes with an intuitive attachment system, making it easy for anyone to set it up in less than 3 minutes. This patent-pending attachment solution is what truly differentiates us from competing solutions.

Wiral was founded in 2016 by four outdoor and filming enthusiasts who saw the need for adding a new perspective while capturing own adventures. The team has now expanded to 9 people, and most of the product development is happening in-house in the offices in Trondheim.

– What has the area of Trøndelag brought to your making? Could this be possible anywhere else? Would it look different if it was?

Trondheim has a great start-up scene, and several start-ups have already created successful camera gear. To be able to learn from these start-ups has been essential to our success. Also, to be close to NTNU and able to recruit great engineers from a leading technical university is really unique for Trondheim.

Photo Courtesy of Wiralcam

– And the something unique to the product/people behind Wiral you wouldn’t necessarily know?
While cable cameras run on steel wires, Wiral LITE runs on a thin static rope usually used for sailing and kitesurfing. Creative solutions like this evolve because our team consists of people with background from kitesurfing, climbing and downhill biking. We have managed to take some great elements from sports, like the rope, and apply it to a completely different product and market.  

– And finally, info for people who would like to know more about or to buy the product etc., where are you online?

Pre-ordering Wiral LITE now before we start shipping will save you 40%, so I definitely recommend that. You can find more information about specs, example footage and user testimonials on www.wiralcam.com.

 

 

Meet Your Makers: Flora Norwegica

Flora Norwegica

This weeks maker is Ceramist Tovelise Røkke-Olsen who, with her friend Mona Sprenger, is bringing back a centuries-old pottery tradition.

The Flora Norwegica is a vase that you won’t find anywhere else in the world. It is handmade with a unique glaze and a distinctly Scandinavian style. Each one is one of a kind!

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

Did you study ceramics at school?

I did, at Statens Kunst og Arbeidskole, which is now called something else, and I finished with that back in 1983.

What did you do after studying?

I was down in Oslo for 20 years, until 2003, working with ceramics and sculpture the whole time – with a few extra jobs on the side to make money. Then moved back to Trondheim.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

Tell us about Flora Norwegica.

It is an extremely old tradition to use. There used to be a number of factories in Trondheim that worked in the same style, but now there is none – only me.

Mona:

It all started with a green ceramic plate and a green, perforated lump. It was all that was left at a flea market at Bøler in Oslo. I brought it home.

The plate’s label said Graveren. After a bit of research, I discovered that it probably was designed by Ragnar Grimsrud. He was the artist manager for Graveren Tegleverk in Sandnes, Norway in the thirties.

One day a friend who works as a curator at the National Museum in Oslo paid me a visit. She told me that the whole story began at the Dutch court during the famous tulip mania of the 1630s. During this period the vase “Tulipere” was created. The vase had multiple holes where the stems could be inserted. It made a splash among the privileged few of the upper class who could afford the precious flower. At its peak, the price for a single tulip onion could be ten times that of what a skilled craftsman would earn in a year.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

Did you have any guide to get started?

No, just started trying. I started trying it one way, but quickly found a more practical way to do it that is probably more like the traditional method.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

How do you think the Trondheim art scene is? 

It is a very small environment here, but there is a good amount of fantastic artists. With ceramics, it’s a little difficult as there isn’t much education for it here. You find a little bit more down in Bergen and Oslo, but some people are coming back to Trondheim.

What is the best part about creating it?

Its very fun to work with, since its two parts, there is a lot of form and composition that you can work with. It supposed to be fun to make, so I’m always experimenting with different ways to form and glaze and everything.

It’s also fun to play with what you put in the vases, whether its flowers or random things you pick up out of the grass on your way home. You can keep things around as long as you want and change it when you want, it’s very fun.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

Find out more:

Keep an eye out at Scandic hotels for some of Tovelise’s work!

Check out Flora Norwegica’s Facebook, right here, and Instagram for fantastic photos of the work, and to find out when you can take your own vase home!

Meet Your Makers: Easy Intervals

Product: Easy Intervals
Maker: Erik Hjertholm, CEO, and Founder of Easy Intervals

Photo courtesy of Easy Intervals

– When did you start and what gave you the inspiration to create your product? 

The idea behind Easy Intervals came when I was doing my previous master’s degree. The thesis we wrote was very big and challenging and it made it hard to find time to work out. I then started doing a lot of research into what’s the most efficient way of staying in shape, and I was quite disappointed when I discovered that High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) was the answer, as I really hate interval training.

There is a ton of research proving that Interval training is one of the best things you can do for your body, but there are so many things you have to pay attention to while doing it, and it’s really hard to find the right resistance to keep you in the different zones you’re supposed to be in, as well as figuring out what type of interval you should do. I decided to find a solution to these problems combining what I already knew about electronics and automation with the latest research on the topic.

– Do you consider yourself a ‘maker’? Do you make other things outside of this? 

I would definitely consider myself a maker. As long as I can remember I have opened things and put them together in new ways to solve some kind of problem I had. Like when I was a kid my older brother didn’t wake up from his alarm, but I did. I took some parts from the garage and an electric motor and made a contraption that shock his whole bed in the morning. It worked like a charm, and I was never bothered by his alarm again. I must have made hundreds of small contraptions like this, and although most of them were merely a curiosity or something just for fun, it thought me a lot about how to make stuff and this has helped me a lot in developing Easy Intervals.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

– Tell us a little more about the product: what makes it unique, where it is made and any special techniques? 

We decided to make a system for exercise bikes first, and after a lot of prototyping, hundreds of 3D-prints and consultation with doctors, exercise scientists, physiotherapists and professors in cybernetics and automation, we now have a working prototype as well as a letter of intent from a potential customer in the field of physiotherapy.

It really makes for a whole new experience when it comes to interval training, as it tackles all the negative aspects of it. It doesn’t matter if you’re a top athlete or have never worked out before as it automatically adjusts itself to your individual fitness level and takes care of everything during the whole workout, even how fast you should pedal. One of the best features of the system is that although it makes sure you reach the required heart rate that is needed, it actually won’t allow you to do more than what is necessary. Intervals really can’t get any easier than this, and I’ve actually started to like them!

– What has the area of Trøndelag bring to your making? Could this be possible anywhere else? Would it look different if it was? 

The development of Easy Intervals would have been really hard to do anywhere else than here. The combination of scientists at the Cardiac Exercise Research Group (CERG) at St Olavs Hospital, professors and experts at NTNU and maker spaces like the Omega workshop supplied both the necessary knowledge and means to develop something like this. It really is a multidisciplinary project that requires expertise in many different fields, and all of them can be found right here.

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland

– And is there something unique to the people behind it and outsider wouldn’t necessarily know, but is cool?

We are extremely stubborn! Not many people know how much effort is required to start a new company, but it is challenging in every way imaginable as you have to learn everything at once and make hard decisions every day. This requires a dedication and stubbornness you don´t find in most people. Although starting a company undoubtedly is really hard, it is also the most rewarding thing I have ever done, so it kind of balances out.

Where can we find you online?

Our website is easy-intervals.com

The List’s List x Spætt Film

Tuesday saw our brief interview with Magnus Skatvold and Håvard Gosse from Spætt Film. During that interview, they gave us a few film suggestions.

Here they are, suggestions from the top of the film food chain!

Håvard:

Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels

A botched card game in London triggers four friends, thugs, weed-growers, hard gangsters, loan sharks and debt collectors to collide with each other in a series of unexpected events, all for the sake of weed, cash, and two antique shotguns.

Snatch

Unscrupulous boxing promoters, violent bookmakers, a Russian gangster, incompetent amateur robbers, and supposedly Jewish jewelers fight to track down a priceless stolen diamond.

Norske Byggeklosser (1972)

This film is well known for its lead actor, Rolv Wesenlund, playing nine different roles. The story follows a married couple Ingrid and Olav Femte meets unforeseen troubles and bureaucracy when they build a new house. A hopeless and hilarious run-in with the system.

Magnus:

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2

The classic band of heroes discovers the origins of the Ooze, the substance which made them mutate from regular turtles to teenage mutant ones, came from. Unfortunately their arch nemesis and supreme baddie, Shredder learns about it too and uses it to enhance himself. So the turtles have to prove again who’s the better ninja fighter.

Fargo

Fargo follows the journey of Jerry, who works in his father-in-law’s car dealership and has gotten himself into a spot of financial problems. He tries various schemes to come up with some money. When all that fails, he sets in motion a plan for two men to kidnap his wife for ransom to be paid by her wealthy father. From the moment of the kidnapping, things go very, very wrong and what was supposed to be a non-violent affair turns bloody. This violence turns loose a pregnant sheriff from Brainerd, MN who is tenacious in her attempts to solve the three murders in her jurisdiction

Apocolypse Now

 

One of the most iconic films ever produced, Apocolypse Now is set during the Vietnam War. Captain Willard is sent on a dangerous mission into Cambodia to assassinate a renegade Colonel who has set himself up as a god among a local tribe.

Nord

After having a nervous breakdown, skier Jomar has isolated himself in a lonely existence as the guard of a ski park. Later on, he learns that he might be the father of a child, he sets out on a strange and poetic journey through Norway on a snowmobile, with 5 liters of alcohol as his only means of sustenance. His journey takes him through jaw-dropping arctic landscapes, but on the way, Jomar seems to do everything possible to avoid reaching his destination. He meets other tender and confused souls, who will all contribute to pushing Jomar further along his reluctant journey towards the brighter side of life.

Oslo 31 August

One day in the life of a young, recovering drug addict who takes a brief leave from his rehabilitation treatment center to interview for a job and catch up with old friends in Oslo.

Reprise

Two competitive friends, fueled by literary aspirations and youthful exuberance, endure the pangs of love, depression and burgeoning careers.

Meet Your Makers: Spætt Film

For this week’s edition of Meet Your Makers, The List stopped by the Spætt Film office to talk to director Magnus Skatvold and CEO/Co-Producer Håvard Gosse about their recent hit film: Trondheimsreisen. They premiered the documentary during Kosmorama International Film Festival this past March and received great acclaim.

For those that missed it during Kosmorama, or those wanting to see it a second time, the film is still currently in theatres.

Peep the trailer:How did you first become interested in film?

Magnus:

For me, it very much so has been a lifelong passion. I’ve been a film-buff since my childhood and I have kind of known from the time

Photo courtesy of Spætt FIlm

I was 10 or 11 that at some point I was going to work with film; either has an actor or director. I was just fascinated with the world of film.

– Any movie in particular?

I think Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2 was one of the first films I saw in the cinema, probably a little too young to see it, but that was just such a profound experience for me.

 

Håvard:

I like to tell a fun story which is when I was born my parents were out at the cinema; watching To Menn for En Baby. I wanted to get out and spoil this horrible film for them…I don’t know if they’ve ever watched it again.

Photo courtesy of Spætt Film

Then my plan was to be an engineer, but I always borrowed my dad’s camera to film little clips. Then I studied math, chemistry, and physics at university and got some extra points for that which got me into my dream course: the film course at NTNU. So thanks to me trying to be an engineer I got into the film class and its grown from there!

 

 

 

Where did the project of Trondheimsreisen come from?

Magnus:

This project had been in development for about a year before we got attached to it. Trondheim Cinema and the producer were in talks about putting to use some the many kilometers of films stock they had stored. And that began the process of what it should be used for, whether a documentary or something else.

We got approached to take a look at the material and got involved in the process. Then we started with interviews, for research and for something we could use in the film. So we started with interesting storytellers in Trondheim, not necessarily famous people, but ones that had personal and historical stories to tell.

Håvard:

We are really happy that Dag Hoel came to us with this project. As we said he had been developing something with Trondheim Kino, but then he needed a storyteller to come on board. Dag Hoel is one of the all-timers here in Trondheim; he’s been producing for many, many years. He knows me from previous work we have done together and of course, Magnus was on his radar as well for being one of the young, new directors from the region that has a lot of experience. So it was well timed that he came to Magnus for the director position.

Magnus:

The dynamic between the producer and myself was very good for the project. We had different views on materials and experience and two voices to tell the story. This resulted in, mainly, positive discussions on the what the story is and could be – which is so broad as we are telling the story of Trondheim over the course of 100 years.

How long did it take to complete the film?

Magnus:

We were contacted about the film about two years ago. The process started there, and while it hasn’t been full time, I’ve spent several hours a week, every week on it for the past two years. It was a lot of different processes, one being getting a hold of all the material and looking through it – which takes hours and hours. You also have to think about it and let it sink in and start to build a story in your head.

There is also the process of editing it all together that started very early on. Within the first month, I started editing together little scenes and trying to get a hold of the style I wanted to use.

Choosing the footage was quite intuitive in a sense. I had done a couple of interviews that were very open, just sitting down with people for an hour or two talking about their lives with no clear agenda. I just wanted to get as much openness as possible, and people ended up using me almost like a therapist. They were talking about things they hadn’t thought about in 10-20 years; people were opening up and crying. I think there is something that happens when people speak to someone half their age or younger starts asking about their lives. How was it being in love during this time or that? What was it like experiencing the war? That gave me a lot to work with.

How was the process compared to your previous work?

Magnus:

This project is very special because we had to find a way of doing it, almost inventing a new way of thinking. The story we were telling isn’t linear where you have a script and just need to follow that. All the materials we had, from the footage, the interviews, and even the sound design was influencing each other. It was after the interviews that I really knew what to look for in the material and footage we had, but also it worked the other way and the material gave me ideas about what to ask people during the interviews.

Håvard:

The only mainframe we really had to guide the process of creating the film was that it started with this shot from 1906 and the ending using footage from the 1980’s. Most people would have organized the film to have it all in chronological order, but Magnus managed to find some kind of fluctuating way to tell the story that still makes it feel like it is going from one point to another. Which is a much more interesting film, I think.

Magnus:

It was a challenge because it needed some structure. The film is chronological in a way that it starts one way and ends more modern in some parts, but it takes some liberties in jumping between decades in ways we felt it was necessary to tell the story. We see the timeline as not only chronological but where do you place something like being a student at NTNU into a specific time period? We wanted to tell things like that, like being a student, as some broader. That we could mix clips from the 1940’s or 60’s or 80’s and that things are very much the same, but also has its differences.

How long did it take to look through all that footage?

Magnus:

Our material came from a lot of sources, from the national library, Studentersammfundet, NRK, and even regular people sending us film from their own collections.

That footage isn’t the same type of quality like some of the stuff from NRK, but having those private moments from real Trondheimer’s became the soul of the film.

Håvard:

We bought a machine to digitize the film ourselves but quickly found out that it wasn’t enough. We could use it to watch through the film but had to send it to a specialist to digitalize it. But its great as now all the footage is being sent to the National Library to be stored and is great for documenting our history.

How was the premiere?

Håvard:

It was awesome for us. I was sitting next to two musicians that have a song in the film and overheard them talking about how they were touched by the film along with everyone else. Everyone was talking about their own experiences in the city, and that was great to hear.

We had people coming up and telling us that they were never going to leave Trondheim again!

Magnus:

It was an overwhelming experience. I’d seen the film 10-20 times already, but it really came alive seeing it with a large audience. It was definitely a high point in my professional life – presenting it with Liv Ullmann of all people and getting such positive feedback from the audience. I had people coming up to me that I didn’t know to thank me for making the film.

We knew of course that this would be popular amongst the older generations of people in Trondheim, but it has shown itself to be more of a cross-generational film and bringing people together.

What’s next?

Magnus:

After Trondheimsreisen it was very good to go back to doing more short-term projects. Also working with the documentary ‘Blue Code of Silence’ [A documentary film about the story of the infamous NYPD officer Bob Leuci] and hopefully we will get some more answers on that in the coming months.

Håvard:

We [Spætt Films] have a short film that is being made with Vegard [Dahle] as director. He made the film ‘Eye’ last year, which won the 72-hour competition at the Jinzhen International Short Film Festival in China last year. We are making a behind-the-scenes movie on that as well. We also have a few feature films that are in development.

Keep an eye out for much more from Spætt films in the future. With some exciting documentaries, fiction films, and entertaining commercials currently in the works. Check out some more of their past, current, and future projects here!

Also stay tuned to TheList.no for a few film suggestions from these two!

Meet your Makers: TinaTing

In the latest volume of The List Magazine, we took a look at some men and women who make stuff in Trondheim. Here, we’d like to introduce Tina Bugge of TinaTing and her beautiful origami artwork. Check out the article in the magazine and enjoy this full interview!

When did you start and what gave you the inspiration to start your business?

I have always liked working with my hands, I’m a very tactile person, with a knack for details. I used to work full time with really practical, minute operations as a staff engineer at NTNU, but with more administrative tasks and less time in the lab, I needed to keep my hands busy.

I started the webshop TinaTing on the marketplace Epla.no at the end of a maternity leave in the summer of 2011. TinaTing is all about eye candy. Either with regards to origami pictures, origami diamonds, origami lamps, or button jewelry. I have come up with a technique where I cover buttons with paper, and then turn them into jewelry like earrings, brooches, rings or cufflinks. This is rather time-consuming, so there is less time for that, unfortunately. Enter origami! Almost instant satisfaction! The metallic paper is an inspiration in itself. It will sparkle when the light hits it at different angles. Origami is all about folding and angles, so I would say it is a perfect match! Some would argue the metallic paper is too tough to fold, but I like it a bit al dente. For instance, if the paper it too light, a PHiZZ-orb for a lamp will fall apart. The lamp is made of 30 identical pieces put together with no glue. Watching a lamp slowly coming apart just from its own weight is strange.

I was invited to join the design collective Sukker in April 2015, and I am still honoured they asked me! The designers there are really an inspiring crowd to hang with. Having an actual store where you can present and sell your things, and meet people who appreciate your design is awesome. Every designer takes a turn to work in the shop. If I hear someone in the shop for instance say – I like that PRSM-picture, but would like it in another colour -, then I can offer to make it. Making pieces which go well with the other designers’ products is also cool. Lise of Miniminuskel and I are making matching dresses of different materials; she makes petite ones for girls, while I fold paper versions. Together they make great presents!

Do you consider yourself a ‘maker’? What do you do with the rest of your time and what is your background making things?

I do indeed consider myself a maker. I like to make eye candy and am easily mesmerized by lovely colours, and especially paper. But nice paper is hard to find in Norway, so I make an effort finding paper online or whenever I travel. With Norwegian import taxes, and sky-rocketing shipping fares it is challenging, but all the more fun when you can make a bargain or a good deal! And somehow along this way, I also ended up becoming the Norwegian retailer for a Canadian paper distributor of Japanese chiyogami paper.

I work full time as a staff engineer at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, I am a mom of two, and a member of the design community Sukker. Besides that, I will fold whenever and wherever, just ask whoever. I always carry paper in my bag, and will fold in planes, trains, automobiles, sofas, parks….

I used to work more hands-on in the lab at NTNU, but with less time in the lab now, I need to keep my hands busy, and origami is perfect! The repetitive folding is like meditation. The joy of creating something beautiful from a flat sheet of paper is just awesome! And building something with modules is amazing, especially if you really couldn’t wrap your head around the instructions in the first place! I still have a piece at home that I really struggled with, that I can’t reproduce. I cannot remember how I did it or crack the code. Really frustrating!

I will never make drawings before making anything. The paper itself is the inspiration. These days are mostly about making beautiful dresses and shirts for cards.

Photo Courtesy of TinaTing

Tell us a little more about the product: what makes it unique, where it is made and any special techniques?

I think people can tell when it is a TinaTing. I am all about straight lines and edges. If it is not a right angle, it is a wrong angle. Sloppy origami is irritating. Colour coordinating is also fun. When making the origami pictures I will sometimes throw the pieces around on the table, and then maybe an unlikely colour combo will appear. The PRSM-pictures are maybe the “most” TinaTing I make.

I am a self-taught origamist and have never invented any origami designs myself. I am in awe of the people who are able to think up the original diagrams!! I will learn new techniques from YouTube rather than from a book. See one, do one, teach one. So why is my stuff special/different from others? I would say the presentation/the whole package; the precision, the materials, and the colour combinations. I have nice paper! I leave nothing to chance (or sometimes everything, it could, seem…). I deliver a complete product, all the way down to the packaging.

What has the area of Trøndelag bring to your making? Could this be possible anywhere else? Would it look different if it was?

I am a native Trønder from Trondheim, so I’ve never left! The size of Trondheim, with the “closeness” to everything, makes it perfect. You can walk or bike to almost anywhere, and the community of designers is very inspiring and including. Being a native Trønder means many of the people I grew up with are still around, thus I can ask them for help, more so than if I was from outside Trondheim. Knowing people at NTNU and the workshops at St.Olav has come in handy in my creative work as well. It is not all about what you know, but who you know. This keeps coming back to me. I would never be this successful in Oslo, as I have no such basic network there. Being an introvert and a creative exhibitionist is hard when you want to sell your stuff. I have been very fortunate, and I feel I have taken the opportunities that have been given and did the most with them.

Photo Courtesy of TinaTing

And the something unique to you and the product we wouldn’t necessarily know?

I may have it all covered? I am also working on outdoor origami. The weather in Trøndelag isn’t always sunny, so I have made PHiZZ-balls that can be placed in the garden. Where I live it will roll around in the garden in the wind. Looking forward to letting it play in the grass again.

And finally, info for people who would like to know more about or to buy the product etc., where are you online?

Instagram would be the most up to date place to find me: @tinabugge.

Facebook: TinaTing 

Artwork and origami paper can be found here.

In person: In Trondheim, the store Sukker, in Bakklandet, is the best place to find my stuff.

And if you are in Oslo you can find TinaTings at Skaperverket in Grünerløkka.

Trondheim Easter Egg Hunt

Last year we wrote up ten different ideas for what to do during the Easter holidays–a sort of activity easter egg hunt. Are you up for the hunt this year? Here are five to get you started.

Read the full article right here!

Words by Tijana Ostojic

First swim of the year

Photo: Todd Quackenbush

If this Easter you are in the company of kids, or even if you are not, how about you finally make that swimming trip you have been planning for a long while now?

The ten-meter dive in Pirbadet sure sounds impressive if you are brave enough to jump, but would you dare jump in the fjord and initiate the beginning of the swimming season?

Here at the List, we hope you would, so we suggest Sjøbadet. Right in the heart of Trondheim, Sjøbadet is a facility equipped with warm showers you might wish for once you give a spring fjord swimming a go. Needless to say, swimming in the fjord does give you bragging rights.

Check out the Library

You might be wondering why we are stopping at the library, but here’s why.

Can you imagine yourself snuggled up on the sofa with a crime novel in your hands? It might be snowing outside, or perhaps not, but you are not aware of it since you are racing through the pages of your book, eager to find out what will happen next.

Norwegian Easter – Crime phenomenon (påskekrim) began in 1923 by the Gyldendal Publishing House which published an ad in the newspapers that at first glance looked like a regular news bulletin. The entry read “The Bergen Train Robbed Last Night”, promoting a crime novel written by Nordahl Grieg and Nils Lie.

The book was a success, and in the years that followed Easter time became synonymous with the peak season for crime literature.

So, why not snuggle up on your sofa and read a crime novel or two while you are waiting for your Easter leg of lamb to roast in the oven? Have a cup of tea or a glass of wine and enjoy a good book.

If you are searching for a place to escape your couch, let us say a place that also serves great coffee, delicious food and has an abundance of books to choose from, give Sellanraa Bok & Bar’s couch a try – you’ll hardly regret it.

Vasfjellet or cross-country skiing

 

 

 

Photo: Anders Kallerud

A farewell to ski season is upon us. Therefore, if the weather allows it, make an effort and go for one last downhill ski trip to Vasfjellet. The sun is finally shining and the idea of some last few turns in this season is tempting, is it not?

You might know by now that cross-country skiing, like the crime novel, is also synonymous with Easter. So, make sure you have packed a few oranges (said to represent the Sun) and KvikkLunsj, as these are the trademarks of an Easter ski trip.

The story goes that a long time ago, Johan Throne Holst, the founder of Freia, went hiking with a colleague one day. Somewhere along the way, they got lost, and the colleague scolded Mr. Holst, who for the very first time had forgotten to bring chocolate on the trip. It is no wonder the KvikkLunsj wrapper displays hiking routes now. So, why don’t you pick up a bar or two and choose from many hiking/trekking/possibly skiing routes they suggest?

After all, you remember that time when you went hiking/trekking/skiing and have forgotten to bring few bars of KvikkLunsj with you? Yeah, neither do we.

Cycling along Skansen and Ladestien

Photo: Nikol Herec

The time has finally come when those who do not dare to cycle throughout the winter to dust the cobwebs off their bikes. With that said; it is a great time to hop on a bike and go for a ride along Skansen and Ladestien. Along the way, you could stop by Lille Skansen, Ladekaia or Sponhuset for a drink or a quick bite.

Don’t own a bike? Well, then we recommend a long, rewarding walk along these trails by the sea.

Learn something at Vitensenteret

 

Photo: Wil Lee-Wright Photography

Vitensenteret is an attractive place for all those who love the wonders of science. Whether you are an adult or a kid, adventure and fun are guaranteed. Besides exciting exhibitions, there are several activities that children are sure to enjoy. Fancy building a ballong bil (we will not tell you what it is, you’ll have to check it out yourself), making a vitamin C rocket, casting pewter figurines, or driving Orbitron?

This is where our ‘Trondheim egg hunt’ ends. The city is stunning during the Easter time too, is it not?

But, if this year you have decided to go on a little adventure somewhere outside the Trondheim’s region, why not rent a cabin with few friends? Don’t forget to bring your skis, a crime novel, Kvikklunsj and good mood along!

Tak for turen!