The List Wants You!


Our small team here at The List is very proud to be representing our community in the capacity we do. It is our ongoing mission to provide engaging, relevant content and have a wide variety of voices to talk about the region. We want to represent a true flavour of what there is to be found here to do, be involved in and what is coming for our future. We are always amazed at all the things there are to learn, and after three years we know we have so much more to cover!

But, how do we make sure we have a lot of viewpoints and voices to accurately represent this vibrant and diverse community? How do we cover so many different things with such a small team? You! Our readers and fans. We rely on a strong base of contributors who share their opinions, passions, stories, photography, art, illustrations and other talents to fill the pages of each issue you see on the streets. We have some professionals, but we are so happy to be able to say that many of our contributors are our readers, students, and people who are all about reaching out to people. No professional qualifications needed, but passion, good quality work, willingness to learn and desire are.

Have you ever thought it would be fun to write for a magazine? Are you heavily involved in something we haven’t covered and should? If you consider yourself someone who has their finger on the pulse of things and wants to get the word out, by all means, let us know!

What about if you are not a writer? Have you ever read an article in the past, and doodled the story on a napkin wishing you could have done an illustration for it? Or thought of a great photo you would have taken? Or are you just curious about how we do what we do, but are not sure how you could be involved? Come and talk to us either in person or by email. From arts and culture to science and technology, we have space for all to join in.

Check out our issues from the past on ISSUU to get a full flavour of how diverse we are!

Feel free to email our Project Manager, Jennifer, at jennifer@thelist.no if you want to get involved.

Have a great weekend! And if you need something to do, check out our Listings Section!

 

Bastard!

Looking for something to do this weekend? Then check out Avant Garden’s Bastard Festival; it starts tomorrow and runs through the weekend.

This annual, performing arts festival seeks to surprise and prod its audience – and take a

You Look Like You // Photo by Efrat Mazor Goldberg

 

good, hard look at our global society in the process. The program for this year’s festival features dance, theatre, film, and every combination of them. Not to mention the artist talks, workshops, seminars, and other social events.

Each fall, The Bastard Festival presents some of the very best contemporary performing arts projects from the Norwegian and international independent art scene. We decided to talk with some of the festival organizers to find out more about some of the performances and find out which ones shouldn’t be missed.

Piece for Person and Ghetto Blaster // Photo by Sarah Walker

The first suggestion was Piece for Person and Ghetto Blaster: a dissection of human behaviour in regards to the complexities of intervention. The performance stems from an interaction the artist had with a man throwing stones at a duck. Branded as “stand-up choreography” this piece mixes dance and humorous text that is sure to appease.

Another to look forward to is (re)remember study – Trondheim. In this, the performance artists asks Trondheim locals to talk them around the city and take them to places with particularly fond memories associated with it. The walks are documented through various mediums; then in a live composition the stories are re-remembered and interpreted through the artistic meditations of the performers.

Bastard Festival offers something unique to the city of Trondheim, and while the artistic side of it may seem daunting, or perhaps too avant garde, to some, the experience is fantastic no matter your sensibilities.

MERCURIAL GEORGE SHOW / Photo by Jocelyn Michel

The stage is set at venues all across town: Teaterhuset Avant Garden, Trøndelag Teater, Olavshallen, Verkstedhallen, Trondhjems kunstforening, a storefront venue and festival bar, Moskus.

 

If you want to find out more about Bastard Festivalen you will find all the info on Avant Garden’s website, in our magazine and recent blog post where we interviewed theatre boss Per Ananiassen.

 

Stay up to date on what’s going on and what to do in Trondheim: http://thelistn.wwwnlss7.a2hosted.com/

An Interview with Per Ananiassen, Theatre Boss of Avant Garden

Photo: Arne Hauge

Boss-man Wil Lee-Wright caught up with Avant Garden’s Per Ananiassen to talk about the venue’s planned change and the performing arts they showcase.

Avant Garden is planning to move to Rosendal Theatre. Why and when did you decide to change location?

The current location used to be a print shop for the city’s second newspaper, Arbeideravisa, the workers’ paper which went bankrupt in 1990. Within 5 years of being in this venue, we realised that it was too small and so we started to look for a bigger venue in 1998.

 So Avant garden has been looking for a new location for the better part of twenty years?! You are now able to move because you have managed to double the theatre’s budget in the last three years, the majority of which comes from subsidies from the ministry for culture and by the region (Sør Trøndelag Fylkeskommune and Trondheim Kommune). Is was the increased funding specifically for the new location or because of your increasing importance to the culture scene in Trondheim?

It was both reasons. I think the Department of Culture in Oslo has started to acknowledge the need of the programming theatres to consolidate and to become stronger. To have stronger artistic proposals and departments, and also that we need infrastructure. After all, we represent the national infrastructure for independent performing arts in Norway. Self financing only makes up about 17% of our budget. Funding makes it easier for us to plan and also to build the organisation.

Tell us more about the history of Rosendal – you must be very excited to have not only found a venue which suits Avant Garden’s practical needs, but one which has a history and name behind it.

It was a cinema built in 1921 by an American company. At that time, Trondheim was very small. Rosendal would have been well outside of town. There were cinemas in Trondheim but they were owned by the municipalities and it was illegal to have private cinemas.

They called it Rosendal Teatro, not kino, because it was regarded to be a little bit more upmarket. I am actually proposing that we change our name when we move there. ‘Avant Garden’ can be seen a little bit pretentious because it is relating to the historical avant garde in the arts. I sympathise with the avant garde movement because it was about making art accessible everywhere, and we are working with artists which have this kind of approach. Avant garde kind of means that you have been to some kind of promised land and you come back and tell. It is kind of old elite thinking in the arts. This was not necessarily intended by all artists in the historical avant garde movement, this is the way people regard it today: elitist.

We don’t want to be that. Avant Garden does not want to be part of the pop culture necessarily, but we use a lot of pop culture methods and media strategies. If you go to Rosendal, everyone knows what it is, where it is. It feels more accessible. We will still be what we are but we will be more than what we are.

The audience size will grow from 66 today to over 200 (and 100 in the smaller space). How important is it to fill the space and how will you accommodate the more marginal artists who do not require larger audiences?

There is some narrow art out there, people who are really taking big chances, experimenting with the new, something we have never seen before. Even I have problems understanding what they are doing, and I have been working in this business for a long time! I know that people have to have possibilities to show their art before they can develop. This is something we have to communicate to the audience too.

Avant Garden has a reputation for being quite cutting edge and for pushing the boundaries. So what will we be seeing at this year’s Bastard festival?

Anne Liv young; the way she is connected with the audience, which can be really hardcore and it’s really hard to be there. And Heine Avdal and Yukiko Sinozaki who are in our programme almost every year, who are super nice and super inviting. They are treating the audience with kindness and respect. In our time, that is also cutting edge! The bullies are ruining the world so some kind of inviting attitude and kindness and respect, can also be cutting edge. It is very much context which decides what is cutting edge.

In all the Bastard Festival programmes I have been responsible for over the years, I have never looked for the politically explicit expressions or projects. There is a lot of discourse going on, but what I am interested in the is the political potentiality in performing arts. Performing art per se is a political expression, because it always points at the nature of itself, namely the coming together of experiencing something together. Creating some kind of common platform and point of references so we can talk about something together. Today that is as important as ever before. Since this media revolution we have been though, we may have a lot to talk about but we talk about the headlines, but we do not talk about the depth of things. It is difficult to get out of the echo chamber.

We are building walls and we don’t allow any cracks to exist in the wall, and we are trying to cover up any cracks which do exist. I want this art festival to be one of the cracks in the wall. To paraphrase the film maker Morten Torvik, every wall has a crack and this is where spirit can come in.

Are other performances therefore more intense for the newcomer to the scene?

No not necessarily. Another highlight is we are opening the festival with Mia Habib’s A Song To…, a Norwegian choreographer from Haugusand. In this production she is choreographing 40 people; 16 professional dancers and 24 more (regular people). All of them are going to be naked on stage. If you want to be part of that you can, if you are willing to take your clothes off in front of the audience!

Are you asking me?! Well… can people still get involved?

You will have to check the status of how many people are signed up.

Also, on Saturday there is an Australian performer called Nicola Gunn with Piece for Person and Ghetto Blaster. She has made a production which is beautiful, fantastically well performed production. She tells a story while she is doing very intricate movements, very choreographed dance moves, and that the same time she is telling a story which raises some ethical questions. What is interesting is thane one hand it is very experimental piece but on the other hand it is a very relatable story. The complexity comes from the movement she is doing combined with the story.

For me, this is what Bastard festival is about. It is a chance too create a another way of reflecting. What you see is not always what you get in theatre. It is a visual art but it is only a tool for conveying something what is happening under the surface.

 

Stay up to date on what’s going on and what to do in Trondheim: http://thelistn.wwwnlss7.a2hosted.com/

Under the Surface: Fascinating Photography

We had such a great response to the photography in the Under The Surface photos in the most recent issue of The List, we decided to catch up with our photographer, Hege Røkenes, to hear more about this amazing art form. Many believed that the photographs could not have been from our very own fjord and the surrounding areas, but they are!

The subtle beauty of humans exploring the sea captured in this image of three divers exploring the sea bed

“The Trondheim fjord and it’s surrounding is a beautiful place for under water exploration with a lot of opportunities to photograph marine life. The inner part of the fjord itself is not known for having the greatest visibility, but knowing that you just have to focus on the stuff that does not require pristine condition, the closer you look the more you will find. The motifs range from wide to macro, I even do shots of macro life with a wide angle fisheye, to get some different expressions. Under water photography requires a lot of practice, and first of all you need to get your diving skills in place, regardless if you are scubadiving or freediving. If you want to start photographing under water i recommend you join a club to meet others with the same interest to learn from. I am a member of Draugen Froskemannsklubb (scuba) and Trondheim fridykkerklubb (freediving) which both has a fair few photography enthusiast in them.” – Hege Røkenes

 

To see more of Hege’s work please and find out how you can see theses fascinating places and creatures, please visit: http://trdfridykk.no and http://www.draugen-fmk.no

A rather photogenic dragonet fish
A shy pipefish using some kelp for cover
A rock lobster!
A complex ecosystem of Medusa coral, urchins, starfish and other sea life.
Busksneglen (Dendronotus frondosus)
Spiny Urchin
Diver surrounded by krill
Sepietta Oweniana (aka Adorable Octopus

Compliments of the Chef: To Rom og Kjøkken

Ole Martin

Cooking, like most skills, takes a bit of practice and a general willingness to learn. A great meal is no more than bringing your best to the table. Any chef worth his or her salt will tell you that their favourite meal is one that they enjoyed not for the fancy place setting or how many ingredients were on the plate, but for how it made them feel about what they were eating. Food is as much a good experience as it is about the food itself.

I was lucky to spend an hour with Ole Martin Sætnan from To Rom og Kjøkken to watch him create a scrumptious dish and talk about his love of cooking. He is a humble chef, and as a former one myself, it is evident we speak the same language when it comes to food. It isn’t just a job; it is a way of life and one that gives much. When Ole Martin spoke about his father taking him to his bakery when he was a boy, it was evident he wasn’t just telling me about a moment in his life, he was there again in his mind. When he recounted his first meal at a Michelin star restaurant, he wasn’t just describing a moment or a meal, I could feel him making his choice to become the chef I was speaking to.

Those who cook for a living choose a demanding path. It isn’t just the hours or the physicality of the work; it is the constant need for reinvention and creating from ingredients used for centuries something new. Knowing this does not seem to faze Ole Martin from where I sat listening. The eagerness to use the best the Trondheim region has to offer and never stop creating didn’t need to be said outright.

Ole Martin from invites you to try your hand at his elegant, yet easy to prepare monkfish entrée that is sure to impress your palette and guests.

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For many, a recipe without weights and measures seems daunting, but this doesn’t have to be so. Think of your favourite dinner plate and imagine how much you might put on there? Do you want 3 or 4 stalks of asparagus per person? Seems more manageable when you think of it like that. Whether you choose to make this dish for one or ten, it is the same concept. Think in terms of volume – filling up the plate. A recipe is little more than a story for food, so read along and then show someone about what you read.

Ingredients for the entrée:

Fresh filet of monkfish
Romanesco broccoli
Pickled red onion (regular if you cannot find pickled)
White asparagus
Finely ground parsley
Fresh radish
Lemon
Butter
Salt

Buerre Blanc Sauce:

225g Butter
1 dl Dry white wine
.5 dl White wine or white wine vinegar
1 Small shallot

How to start:

There is a term in French chefs use which sums it all up: mise en place. It roughly translates to ‘everything in its place and a place for everything’ and refers to the preparations for dinner service. With a little time spent gathering your ingredients, preparing them and planning your steps you’ll be serving a meal to be proud of. Take it slow, pay attention to the timing of when things will be done, and enjoy the process.

Preparing the Monkfish:

You may choose to clean and portion your fish or ask for it to be done at the fish market. They can also guide you to how much you would need depending on the number of guests.
Take each portion your fish filet and place it in a shallow, lightly buttered, oven-safe dish. Sprinkle a little salt on it and drizzle with a little lemon juice. Cook for 15 minutes in a 140º C with a bit of water in a shallow dish in the oven. When it comes out of the oven, and just before you put it on the plate, dust with the ground parsley. Ole Martin ingeniously used a fine mesh tea infuser to do this.

Preparing your Sautéed Vegetables:

As a general rule, vegetables to sauté should be cut bite-sized because this makes them easy to eat and also, they will cook evenly. In considering how much butter or oil to use when cooking, use enough to allow the vegetables to move but not swim in it. A little goes a long way.

This is where timing comes in that I mentioned before. Start to cook your vegetables at the same time as your fish. When it goes in the oven, your sauté pan should be hot and ready to go.

Romanesco broccoli

Allow your pan to heat up on a higher heat, add a bit of butter and toss in your Romanesco. Give it just a minute to cook and add your asparagus spear, and just at the end your pickled red onion. You can substitute with regular if you cannot find pickled (or make it). You want to cook everything, but not so long you lose the all the crispness of the Romanesco and asparagus.

Preparing your Buerre Blanc:

Sauces scare people away, and I am not sure why they seem so complicated, some are to be fair, but most are made with just a few ingredients and a bit of time. For a beurre blanc or any butter sauce, it can be made ahead but needs to be kept warm in an insulated container or a hot water bath.

First, cut your butter into small cubes and return to fridge to keep chilled. Next, finely mince your shallots. In a sauce pan place your shallots and both wines (or wine and vinegar), bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer. Allow it to reduce to about two tablespoons of liquid. Slowly add a cube or two of butter at a time while whisking rapidly. Remove from the heat before you whisk in the last of the butter and then add salt and pepper to your liking.

If you prefer, you can strain the liquid before adding the butter to have a smooth sauce as Ole Martin has on his dish.

Garnishing your Plate:

When it comes to plating up your meal, be playful! Ole Martin has added fresh herbs, shaved radish and nasturtium blossom petals (from his garden) to his sautéed Romanesco and asparagus mixture. He used the asparagus as the base to showcase the colourful Romanesco broccoli. It comes in green, white and purple varieties, which he has used here.

Less is sometimes more when it comes to a plate. Let everything show itself off, and your food will always look great. Now, enjoy and come back next issue for a new recipe that might become (if this hasn’t already) your favourite dish!

To book a table and learn more about To Rom og Kjøkken visit their website at
http://www.toromogkjokken.no